1887

Abstract

In this study, the intestinal microbial proteome of children with established type 1 diabetes (T1D) was compared with the proteome of healthy children (Control) with the aim to identify differences in the activity of the intestinal microbiota that not only will contribute to a deeper knowledge of the functionality of the gut in these children but also may provide new approaches to improve the control of the disease. Faecal protein extracts collected from three T1D children (aged 9.3±0.6 years) and three Control children (aged 9.3±1.5 years) were analysed using a combination of 2D gel electrophoresis and spectral counting. The results evidenced markedly differences between the intestinal proteome of T1D children and the Control. The T1D microbial intestinal proteome was enriched with proteins of clostridial cluster XVa and cluster IV and Bacteroides. In contrast, the Control proteome was enriched with bifidobacterial proteins. In both groups, proteins with moonlight function were observed. Human proteins also distinguished the two groups with T1D children depleted in exocrine pancreatic enzymes.

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2017-03-09
2019-10-20
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