1887

Abstract

Conditions were optimized for the batch growth of S-313 under sulfur-limited conditions. grew exponentially with sulfate as the sole source of sulfur, and growth was concomitant with the utilization of sulfate until it was exhausted. A further 20% of protein was synthesized after the apparent disappearance of sulfate. A mass balance for the utilized sulfate in cell material was calculated, given the observed molar growth yield of about 3·6 kg protein (mol S) and a sulfur content of 0·41% S in dry matter. Similar data were obtained for growth with cysteine and thiocyanate. The organism also grew exponentially with 4-toluenesulfonate (TS) as sulfur source, essentially as observed with sulfate, except that negligible protein formation after exhaustion of TS was observed. Similar data were also obtained with 4-nitrocatecholsulfate (NCS) and ethanesulfonate. Any substrate pair selected from sulfate, cysteine and thiocyanate was utilized simultaneously, and although one of the pair of substrates was always preferred, growth continued at the same rate when only one substrate remained. Growth after substrate exhaustion was observed. Any substrate pair selected from TS, NCS and ethanesulfonate gave similar data, but with less growth after exhaustion of the sulfur sources. If a mixed substrate pair was chosen from the two groups, the sulfur source from the first-named group was initially used exclusively, and the second source of sulfur was utilized subsequently, after a lag phase. The data are considered to reflect the control of scavenging for sulfur and of distribution of sulfur in the cell exerted by the sulfate-starvation-induced stimulon [Kertesz, Leisinger & Cook, (1993) 175, 1187-1189].

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