1887

Abstract

The survival and growth of populations of the obligately anaerobic pathogenic bacterium enriched for large capsules (LCs), small capsules (SCs) or an electron-dense layer (EDL; non-capsulate by light microscopy) were examined in a mouse model of infection over a minimum period of 20 d. Chambers which allowed the influx of leukocytes, but not the efflux of bacteria, were implanted in the mouse peritoneal cavity. The LC and EDL populations consistently attained viable cell densities of the order of 10-10 c.f.u. ml within 24 h, whereas the SC population did not. However, after 3 d, all three bacterial populations maintained total viable numbers of 10-109 c.f.u. ml within the chambers. LC expression was selected against within 24 h in the model, the populations becoming non-capsulate by light microscopy, whereas in the SC population expression of the SC was retained by approximately 90% of the population. The EDL population remained non-capsulate by light microscopy throughout. Lymphocytes infiltrated the chambers to an equal extent for all three populations and at approximately 1000 times higher concentration than chambers which contained only quarter-strength Ringer's solution. The presence of neutrophils within the chambers did not cause a decrease in the total viable bacterial count. Each population elicited antibodies specific for outer-membrane proteins and polysaccharide, as detected by immunoblotting, which cross-reacted with the other populations. Differences were observed in the immunogenicity of the outer-membrane proteins within the three populations. Neutrophils were initially the predominant cell type in the chambers, but as the total leukocyte count increased with incubation time, neutrophils were outnumbered by other leukocytes. Flow cytometric investigations indicated that by day 7 the majority of these leukocytes were B-cells. Bearing in mind the constraints of this model system, it appears that all three populations of have the potential for growth and that each elicits an immune reaction.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-141-8-1969
1995-08-01
2021-08-06
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/141/8/mic-141-8-1969.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-141-8-1969&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Brown R., Hornett K.E., Poxton I.R. 1989; Immunochemistry of the cell surfaces of Bacteroides bivius and Bacteroides disiens. J Med Microbiol 28:267–273
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Duerden B.I. 1991; Anaerobes in genitourinary infections. In Anaerobes in Human Disease pp. 224–244 Edited by Duerden B.I., Drasar B.S. London: Edward Arnold;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Finlay-Jones J.J., Hart P.H., Spencer LK., Nulsen M.F., Kenny P.A., McDonald P.J. 1991; Bacterial killing in vitro by abscess-derived neutrophils. J Med Microbiol 34:73–81
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Genco C.A., Arko R.J. 1994; Animal chamber models for study of host-parasite interactions. Methods Emzymol 235:120–140
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Li C.Y., Lam K.W., Yam L.T. 1973; Esterases in human leukocytes. J Histochem Cytochem 21:1–12
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Lutton D.A. 1991 Variability of surface structure expression in Bacteroides fragilis PhD thesis, The Queen’s University of Belfast.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Lutton D.A., Patrick S., Crockard A.D., Stewart L.D., Larkin M.J., Dermott E., McNeill T.A. 1991; Flow cytometric analysis of within-strain variation in polysaccharide expression by Bacteroides fragilis by use of murine monoclonal antibodies. J Med Microbiol 35:229–237
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Namavar F., Theunissen E.B., Verweij-van Vught A.M., Peer-booms P.G., Bal M., Hoitsma H.F., MacLaren D.M. 1989; Epidemiology of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the colonic flora of patients with colonic cancer. J Med Microbiol 29:171–176
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Otto B.R., Verweij W.R., Sparrius M., Verweij-van Vught A.M.J.J., Nord C.E., Maclaren D.M. 1991; Human immune-response to an iron-repressible outer-membrane protein. Infect Imtnun 59:2999–3003
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Patrick S. 1988; Phagocytosis of Bacteroides fragilis in vitro. In Anaerobes Today pp. 31–41 Edited by Hardie J. M., Boriello S. P. Chichester: J. Wiley;
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Patrick S. 1993; The virulence of Bacteroides fragilis. Rev Med Microbiol 4:40–49
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Patrick S., Larkin M.J. 1993; Attachment in disease. In Microbial Biofilms: Formation and Control pp. 109–131 Edited by Denyer S. P., Gorman S. P., Sussman M. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific;
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Patrick S., Lutton D.A. 1990a; Bacteroides fragilis surface structure expression in relation to virulence. Med Mai Infect (hors serie) 20:19–25
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Patrick S., Lutton D.A. 1990b; Outer membrane proteins of Bacteroides fragilis grown in vivo. FEMS Microbiol Lett 71:1–4
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Patrick S., Reid J.H., Larkin M.J. 1984; The growth and survival of capsulate and non-capsulate Bacteroides fragilis in vivo and in vitro. J Med Microbiol 17:237–246
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Patrick S., Stewart L.D., Damani N., Wilson K.G., Lutton D.A., Larkin M.J., Poxton I., Brown R. 1995; Immunological detection of Bacteroides fragilis in clinical samples. J Med Microbiol 42: (in press)
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Reid J.H., Patrick S. 1984; Phagocytic and serum killing of capsulate and non-capsulate Bacteroides fragilis. J Med Microbiol 17:247–257
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Reid J.H., Patrick S., Tabaqchali S. 1987; Immunochemical characterization of a polysaccharide antigen of Bacteroides fragilis with an IgM monoclonal antibody. J Gen Microbiol 133:171–179
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Rotstein O.D. 1992; Role of fibrin deposition in the pathogenesis of intraabdominal infection. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis 11:1064–1068
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Rotstein O.D., Meakins J.L. 1990; Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of intraabdominal infections. World J Surg 14:159–166
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Tally F.P., Ho J.L. 1987; Management of patients with intraabdominal infection due to colonic perforation. Curr Clin Top Infect Dis 8:266–295
    [Google Scholar]
  22. van Tassell R.L., Wilkins T.D. 1978; Isolation of auxotrophs of Bacteroides fragilis. Can J Microbiol 24:1619–1621
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Verweij W.R., Namavar F., Schouten W.F., MacLaren D.M. 1991; Early events after intra-abdominal infection with Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli. J Med Microbiol 35:18–22
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Willis A.T. 1991; Abdominal sepsis. In Anaerobes in Human Disease pp. 197–223 Edited by Duerden B. I., Drasar B. S. London: Edward Arnold;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-141-8-1969
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-141-8-1969
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error