1887

Abstract

Many of the changes induced in yeast by sublethal yet stressful amounts of ethanol are the same as those resulting from sublethal heat stress. They include an inhibition of fermentation, increased induction of petites and stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity. Ethanol, at concentrations (4-10%, v/v) that affect growth and fermentation rates, is also a potent inducer of heat-shock proteins including those members of the Hsp70 protein family induced by heat shock. This induction occurs above a threshold level of about 4% ethanol, although different heat-shock proteins and heat-shock gene promoters are optimally induced at different higher ethanol levels. In addition ethanol (6-8%) causes the same two major changes to integral plasma-membrane protein composition that result from a sublethal heat stress, reduction in levels of the plasma membrane ATPase protein and acquisition of the plasma membrane heat-shock protein Hsp30.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-140-11-3031
1994-11-01
2021-05-16
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/140/11/mic-140-11-3031.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-140-11-3031&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Aguilera A., Benitez T. Synergistic effects of ethanol and temperature on yeast mitochondria. Curr Microbiol 1989; 18:179–188
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Ananthan J., Goldberg A.L., Voellmy R. Abnormal proteins serve as eukaryotic stress signals and trigger the activation of heat shock genes. Science 1985; 232:522–524
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Borkovich K.A., Farrelly F.W., Finkelstein D.B., Taulien J., Lindquist S. hsp82 is an essential protein that is required in higher concentrations for growth of cells at higher temperatures. Mol Cell Biol 1989; 9:3919–3930
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cartwright C.P., Veazey F.J., Rose A.H. Effect of ethanol on activity of the plasma membrane ATPase in, and accumulation of glycine by, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J Gen Microbiol 1987; 133:857–865
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Casey G.P., Ingledew W.M. Ethanol tolerance in yeasts. CRC Crit Rev Microbiol 1986; 13:219–280
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cheng L., Piper P.W. Weak acid preservatives block the heat shock response and heat-shock-element-directed lacZ expression of low pH Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures, an inhibitory action partially relieved by respiratory deficiency. Microbiology 1994; 140:1085–1096
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Coote P.J. Mechanisms of induced thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1993 PhD thesis, University of Nottingham;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Coote P.J., Cole M.B., Jones M.V. Induction of increased thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae may be triggered by a mechanism involving intracellular pH. J Gen Microbiol 1991; 137:1701–1708
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Costa V., Reis E., Quintanilha A., Moradas-Ferreira P. Acquisition of ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: the key role of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Arch Biochem Biophys 1993; 300:608–614
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Craig E.A., Jacobsen K. Mutations of the heat-inducible 70 kilodalton genes of yeast confer temperature-sensitive growth. Cell 1984; 38:841–849
    [Google Scholar]
  11. DeVirgilio C., Piper P.W., Boiler T., Wiemken A. Acquisition of thermotolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae without heat shock protein Hspl04 and in the absence of protein synthesis. FEBS Lett 1991; 288:86–90
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Finley D., Ozkaynak E., Varshavsky A. The yeast polyubiquitin gene is essential for resistance to high temperatures, starvation and other stresses. Cell 1987; 48:1035–1048
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Gropper T., Rensing L. Inhibitors of proteases and other stressors induce low molecular weight heat shock proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Exp Mycol 1993; 17:46–54
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Iida H. Multistress resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is generated by insertion of retrotransposon Ty into the 5′ coding region of the adenylate cyclase gene. Mol Cell Biol 1988; 8:5555–5560
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Jones R.P. Biological principles for the effects of ethanol. Enzyme Microb Technol 1989; 11:130–153
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Kirk N. Process effectiveness of yeast expression vectors 1993 PhD thesis, University of London;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Kirk N., Piper P.W. The determinants of heat shock element-directed lacZ expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast 1991a; 7:539–546
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Kirk N., Piper P.W. Methanol as a convenient inducer of heat shock element-directed heterologous gene expression in yeast. Biotech Lett 1991b; 13:465–470
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Leao C., van Uden N. Effects of ethanol and other alkanols on the kinetics and the activation parameters of thermal death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biotechnol Bioeng 1982; 24:1581–1590
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Leao C., van Uden N. Effects of ethanol and other alkanols on passive proton influx in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochim Biophys Acta 1984; 774:43–48
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Leao C., van Uden N. Effects of ethanol and other alkanols on the temperature relations of glucose transport and fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 1985; 22:359–363
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Lloyd D., Morrell S., Carlsen H.N., Degn H., James P.E., Rowlands C.C. Effects of growth with ethanol on fermentation and membrane fluidity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast 1993; 9:825–833
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Mager W.H., Moradas-Ferreira P. Stress response of yeast. Biochem J 1993; 290:1–13
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Neves M.-J., Francois J. On the mechanism by which a heat shock induces trehalose accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochem J 1992; 288:559–564
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Nover L. The heat shock response 1991 Boston and London: CRC Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Panaretou B., Piper P.W. Plasma-membrane ATPase action affects several stress tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the extent and duration of the heat shock response. J Gen Microbiol 1990; 136:1763–1770
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Panaretou B., Piper P.W. The plasma membrane of yeast acquires a novel heat shock protein (Hsp30) and displays a decline in proton-pumping ATPase levels in response to both heat shock and the entry to stationary phase. Eur J Biochem 1992; 206:635–640
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Parsell D.A., Lindquist S. The function of heat shock proteins in stress tolerance: degradation and reactivation of damaged proteins. Annu Rev Genet 1993; 27:437–496
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Parsell D.A., Sanchez Y., Stitzel J.D., Lindquist S. Hspl04 is a highly conserved protein with two essential nucleotide binding sites. Nature 1991; 353:270–273
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Petko L., Lindquist S. HSP26 is not required for growth at high temperatures, nor for thermotolerance, spore development, or germination. Cell 1986; 45:885–894
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Piper P.W. Molecular events associated with the acquisition of heat tolerance in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FEMS Microbiol Rev 1993; 11:339–356
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Piper P.W., Curran B., Davies M.W., Hirst K., Lockheart A., Seward K. Catabolite control of the elevation of PGK mRNA levels by heat shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Microbiol 1988; 2:353–361
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Plesset J., Palm C., McLaughlin C.S. Induction of heat shock proteins and thermotolerance by ethanol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochem Biophys Res Comrnm 1982; 108:1340–1345
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Praekelt U.M., Meacock P.A. HSP12, a new heat shock gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: analysis of structure, regulation and function. Mol Gen Genet 1990; 223:97–106
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Récnacq M., Boucherie H. Isolation and sequence of HSP30, a yeast heat-shock gene coding for a hydrophobic membrane protein. Curr Genet 1993; 23:435–442
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Rosa M.F., Sa-Correia I. In vivo activation by ethanol of plasma membrane ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Appl Environ Microbiol 1991; 57:830–835
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Rose A.H. Composition of the envelope layers of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to flocculation and ethanol tolerance. J Appl Bacterial Symp Suppl 1993; 74:110S–118S
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Sanchez Y., Taulein J., Borkovich K.A., Lindquist S. Hspl04 is required for tolerance to many forms of stress. EMBO J 1992; 11:2357–2364
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Serrano R. Transport across yeast vacuolar and plasma membranes. In The Molecular Biology of the Yeast Saccharomyces. Genome dynamics 1991 Edited by Strathern J.N., Jones E.W., Broach J.R. Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; rotein synthesis, and Energetics, pp 523–585
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Sherman F., Fink G.R., Hicks J.B. Methods in Yeast Genetics 1983 Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Susek R.E., Lindquist S.L. Hsp26 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is related to the superfamily of small heat shock proteins, but is without a demonstrable function. Mol Cell Biol 1989; 9:5265–5271
    [Google Scholar]
  42. van Uden N. Effects of ethanol on the temperature relations of viability and growth in yeast. Crit Rev Biotechnol 1984a; 1:263–272
    [Google Scholar]
  43. van Uden N. Temperature profiles of yeasts. Adv Microb Physiol 1984b; 25:195–251
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Watson K. Microbial stress proteins. Adv Microb Physiol 1990; 31:183–223
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Werner-Washburne M., Stone D.E., Craig E.A. Complex intractions among members of an essential subfamily of hsp70 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mol Cell Biol 1987; 7:2568–2577
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Werner-Washburne M., Becker J., Kosic-Smithers J., Craig E.A. Yeast HSP70 levels vary in response to the physiological status of the cell. J Bacterial 1989; 171:2680–2688
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-140-11-3031
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/13500872-140-11-3031
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error