1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Only strain 127 out of many and Providence strains was transduced to kanamycin resistance by high-frequency transducing variants, 5006MHFT and 5006MHFT, of phage 5006M, a general transducing phage for strain 5006. The phages adsorbed poorly to strain 127 and did not form plaques. The transduction frequency of 127 by these phages was 5 × 10/p.f.u. adsorbed. Phage 5006M increased the transduction frequencies. Abortive transductants were not detected. Transductants segregated kanamycin-sensitive clones at high frequency and this, together with data from the inactivation of transducing activity of lysates by ultraviolet irradiation, indicated that transduction was by lysogenization. The general transducing property of the phages was not expressed in transductions to auxotrophs of 127. Transductants (type I) resulting from low multiplicities of phage input adsorbed phage to the same extent as 127. This suggested a defect in the transducing particles (or host) because single phage 5006M infection converted strain 5006 to non-adsorption of homologous phage. Type I transductants did not liberate phage, suggesting a defective phage maturation function. Transductants (type II) which arose from higher multiplicities of phage input did not adsorb phage, indicating possible heterogeneity among transducing particles. Phage derived from type II transductants adsorbed poorly to 127 and transduced it to kanamycin resistance at frequencies similar to those of phages 5006MHFT and 5006MHFT, ruling out host-controlled modification as a cause of the low transduction frequencies. This phage transduced 5006 to antibiotic resistance at high frequencies but generalized transduction was again not detected. It was suggested that general transduction could be performed by particles which, due to a different composition and/or mode of chromosomal integration, made material they carried susceptible to host-cell modification.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-89-2-299
1975-08-01
2022-01-25
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/89/2/mic-89-2-299.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-89-2-299&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Adams M. H. 1956; Methods of study of bacterial viruses. Methods in Medical Research 2:1–73
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Adelberg E. A., Mandel M., Chen G. C. C. 1965; Optimal conditions for mutagenesis by N-methyl-N--nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Escherichia coli K12. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 18:788–795
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brenner D. J., Falkow S. 1971; Molecular relationships among members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Advances in Genetics 16:81–118
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Carpenter K. P. 1964; The Proteus-Providence group. In Recent advances in Clinical Pathology series IV pp. 13–24 London:: Churchill.;
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Chakrabarty A. M., Gunsalus I. C. 1970; Transduction and genetic homology between Pseudomonas species putida and aeruginosa. Journal of Bacteriology 103:830–832
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Chan R. K., Botstein D., Watanabe T., Ogata Y. 1972; Specialized transduction of tetracycline resistance by phage P22 in Salmonella typhimurium. Virology 50:883–898
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Clowes R. C., Hayes W. 1968 Experiments in Microbial Genetics. Oxford and Edinburgh:: Blackwell Scientific Publications.;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Coetzee J. N. 1961; Lysogenic conversion in the genus Proteus. Nature; London: 189946–947
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Coetzee J. N. 1963a; Lysogeny in Proteus rettgeri and the host-range of P. rettgeri and P. hauseri bacteriophages. Journal of General Microbiology 31:219–229
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Coetzee J. N. 1963b; Lysogeny in Providence strains and the host-range of Providence bacteriophages. Nature; London: 197515–516
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Coetzee J. N. 1963c; Host-range of Proteus morganii bacteriophages. Nature; London: 199
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Coetzee J. N. 1972; Genetics of the Proteus group. Annual Review of Microbiology 26:23–54
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Coetzee J. N. 1974a; Properties of Proteus and Providence strains harbouring recombinant plasmids between P -lac and RI drd19 or R447b. Journal of General Microbiology 80:119–130
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Coetzee J. N. 1974b; High frequency transduction of kanamycin resistance in Proteus mirabilis. Journal of General Microbiology 84:285–296
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Coetzee J. N. 1975; High frequency transduction of resistance to ampicillin and kanamycin in Proteus mirabilis. Journal of General Microbiology 87:173–176
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Coetzee J. N., Datta N., Hedges R. W. 1972; R factors from Proteus rettgeri. Journal of General Microbiology 72:543–552
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Coetzee J. N., Sacks T. G. 1960; Transduction of streptomycin resistance in Proteus mirabilis. Journal of General Microbiology 23:445–455
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Coetzee J. N., Smit J. A. 1969; Restriction of a transducing bacteriophage in a strain of Proteus mirabilis. Journal of General Virology 4:593–607
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Coetzee J. N., Smit J. A. 1970; Properties of Proteus mirabilis phage 13vir. Journal of General Virology 9:247–249
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Coetzee J. N., Smit J. A., Prozesky O. W. 1966; Properties of Providence and Proteus morganii Hi transducing phages. Journal of General Microbiology 44:167–176
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Datta N., Hedges R. W. 1972; Host ranges of R factors. Journal of General Microbiology 70:453–460
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Demerek M., Ohta N. 1964; Genetic analyses of Salmonella typhimurium Escherichia coli hybrids. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 52:317–323
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Dienes L. 1946; Reproductive processes in Proteus cultures. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 63:265–270
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Dienes L. 1947; Further observations on the reproduction of bacilli from large bodies in Proteus cultures. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 66:97–98
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Falkow S., Ryman I. R., Washington O. 1962; Deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of Proteus and Providence organisms. Journal of Bacteriology 53:1318–1321
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Falkow S., Wohlhieter J. A., Citarella R. V., Baron L. S. 1964; Transfer of episomic elements to Proteus. Journal of Bacteriology 88:1598–1601
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Goldberg R. B., Bender R. A., Streicher S. L. 1974; Direct selection for PI-sensitive mutants of enteric bacteria. Journal of Bacteriology 118:810–814
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Gottesman M. M., Hicks M. L., Gellert M. 1973; Genetics and functions of DNA ligase in Escherichia coli. Journal of Molecular Biology 77:531–547
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Hedges R. W., Datta N., Coetzee J. N., Dennison S. 1973; R factors from Proteus morganii. Journal of General Microbiology 77:249–259
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Heip J., Rolfe B., Schell J. 1974; Abolition of host cell restriction by high multiplicity of phage infection. Virology 59:356–370
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Holloway B. W., Krishnapillai V., Stanisich V. 1971; Pseudomonas genetics. Annual review of Genetics 5:425–446
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Hoppe I., Roth J. 1974; Specialized transducing phages derived from Salmonella phage P22. Genetics 76:633–654
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Inselburg J. 1966; Phage PI modification of bacterial DNA studied by generalized transduction. Virology 30:257–265
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Kondo E., Mitsuhashi S. 1964; Drug resistance of enteric bacteria. IV. Active transducing bacteriophage PICM produced by the combination of R factor with bacteriophage PI. Journal of Bacteriology 88:1266–1276
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Kondo E., Mitsuhashi S. 1966; Drug resistance of enteric bacteria. VI. Introduction of bacteriophage Pi CM into Salmonella typhi and formation of PidCM and F-CM elements. Journal of Bacteriology 91:1787–1794
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Krizsanovich K. 1973; Cryptic lysogeny in Proteus mirabilis. Journal of General Virology 19:311–320
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Luria S.E, Adams J. N., TING R.C. 1960; Transduction of lactose-utilizing ability among strains of E. coli and S. dysenteriae and the properties of the transducing phage particles. Virology 12:348–390
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Ozeki H., Ikeda H. 1968; Transduction mechanisms. Annual Review of Genetics 2:245–278
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Signer E. R. 1969; Plasmid formation: a new mode of lysogeny by phage λ. Nature; London: 223158–160
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-89-2-299
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-89-2-299
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error