1887

Abstract

Summary: Strains designated as were found to constitute two distinct groups on the basis of wall sugar patterns, nucleotide-sequence similarities of DNA preparations and nutritional requirements. Organisms in homology group I had walls which contained only glucose and would grow in a mineral salts-glucose medium with 0·05 μg./ml. biotin, although growth was improved by the addition of amino acids. Some strains labelled and belonged to this group. Organisms in homology group II had glucose and galactose as wall sugars and would not grow in mineral salts-glucose medium with amino acids and 10 vitamins unless yeast extract was also added. Strains of and some strains labelled belonged to group II.

It is recommended that the name be retained for the organisms in group I, while is suggested for group II. Some of the strains labelled and the strains of and did not belong to either group.

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1971-07-01
2021-10-18
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