1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Spores of five strains of differing widely in their heat resistance contained 7·4 to 13·4 % dipicolinic acid. There appeared to be no correlation between DPA content and heat resistance of the various strains. The rate of loss of DPA during heating at 75 and 100° was consistently slower than the rate of loss of spore viability, though, in general, heat-resistant strains lost DPA less quickly than did heat-sensitive strains. At the instant of thermal death, spores still retained 28 to 99·6 % of their original DPA, though this DPA could be released on continued heating.

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1970-11-01
2022-05-27
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