1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Histochemical evidence showed that infection of tuber tissues and tissue-culture cells of by and caused swelling and disruption of host cytoplasmic particles containing acid phosphatase, esterases and proteases. Heavy diffuse cytoplasmic staining for acid phosphatase was a consistent feature of infection by all three fungi, but staining reactions for esterases and proteases showed much less diffuse staining and a lesser degree of particle swelling. Biochemical assays showed that acid phosphatase was liberated from the particulate fraction to the supernatant fluid fraction of infected callus cells; acid ribonuclease behaved similarly. The biochemical evidence suggested that esterase activity of infected cells remained associated with a sedimentable fraction from cell homogenates. Assay methods for proteolytic enzymes did not confirm the histochemical evidence of a particulate localization of these enzymes in healthy or infected callus tissues. An excess recovery of ribonuclease from tissues infected with and was found; the significance of this is discussed. Attempts to separate a particulate fraction rich in hydrolases from homogenates of healthy or infected potato tubers were unsuccessful.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-56-3-321
1969-06-01
2021-10-26
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