1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Proteinase produced by Group A streptococci was associated with a decrease in hyaluronidase production which was not related to any other known environmental condition. The concentration of proteinase which was correlated with decreased hyaluronidase production was constant for a given strain. Inactive polysaccharidase components in cell-free filtrates were converted to active form by a number of different agents, namely, sodium sulphite, zine and calcium ions, auto-claved broth and pantothenie acid. Bacterial dextran, pectin and inulia were depolymerized by cell-free filtrates and by partially purified enzymes derived from Type 4, Type 22 and Type 2 strains. Depolymerase was associated with hyaluronidase and amylase in biologically active material prepared by fractional precipitation.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-5-2-239
1951-05-01
2022-01-20
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