1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

γ-Glutamyl transfer activity was found to be widely distributed in different bacterial species. The γ-glutamyl transfer from glutathione to water and acceptors other than water was studied with cell-free preparations of In the absence of added acceptor, the γ-glutamyl residue was predominantly transferred to water; however, some transfer to the substrate, resulting in the formation of γ-glutamylglutathione, was detected. In the presence of acceptors (amino acids or peptides) all the γ-glutamyl residue was transferred to the added acceptor. The different reactionproducts were isolated and identified. Kinetics and properties of the γ-glutamyl transfer reaction were studied.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-41-2-185
1965-11-01
2022-06-27
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