1887

Abstract

SUMMARY In studying 8 strains of and 7 strains of atypical mycobacteria all 15 were found to produce, in addition to the typical acid-fast cells, non acid-fast ones, which gradually developed intracellular spore-like bodies; later free-lying spores were seen in the same cultures. This process occurred in heavily inoculated Löwenstein–Jensen medium cultures, which were at least 8 weeks old and were frequently aerated during incubation. With the atypical mycobacteria it occurred more readily in cultures in Kirschner fluid medium than on solid media. When the cultures containing spores were inoculated on nutrient agar plates, endospore-forming, rapidly growing organisms were obtained, which were not acid-fast. These organisms when obtained from independent cultures of the same strain appeared to be identical in bacillary and colonial morphology at their first isolation on nutrient agar, but the organisms from different strains showed variation in these characters. Thus mycobacteria appear able to grow in two different forms: form 1, which is acid-fast and multiplies by fission only; form 2, which is not acid-fast, produces endospores regularly and can be maintained in pure culture on nutrient agar. A series of phases of development of form 2 cells in the cultures of form 1 organisms in serial smear examination of Löwenstein–Jensen medium cultures is described. It is suggested that mycobacteria might be considered as dimorphic organisms in the same sense as some of the human pathogenic fungi are known to be dimorphic. Evidence is submitted that form 2 organisms are not contaminants.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-26-1-97
1961-09-01
2022-07-02
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/26/1/mic-26-1-97.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-26-1-97&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bassermann F. J. 1953 Probleme der Morphologie, Cytochemie und Wuchsform des Tuberculoseerregers pp 2069 Stuttgart: Georg Thieme Verlag;
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Brieger E. M., Glauert A. M. 1956; Spore-like structures in the tubercle bacillus. Nature, Lond 178:544
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cohn M. L., Middlebrook G., Russell W. F. 1959; Combined drug treatment of tuberculosis. J. clin. Invest 38:1349
    [Google Scholar]
  4. CsiLLAG A. 1960; Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining of ‘atypical’ mycobacteria and tubercle bacilli. Tubercle, Lond 41:63
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Csillag A. 1961; Morphological and biochemical features of ‘atypical’ mycobacteria. J. gen. Microbiol 24:261
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cummins C. S., Harris H. 1958; Studies on the cell-wall composition and taxonomy of Actinomycetales and related groups. J. gen. Microbiol 18:173
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Gordon R. E., Mihm J. M. 1957; A comparative study of some strains received as Nocardiae. J. Bad 73:15
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gordon R. E., Mihm J. M. 1958; Sporulation by two strains of Nocardia asteroides. J. Bad 75:239
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Jensen H. L. 1931; Contribution to our knowledge of the Actinomycetales. II. The definition and subdivision of the genus Actinomyces, with a preliminary account of Australian soil actinomycetes Proc. Linn. Soc. N.S.W 56:345
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Jensen K. A. 1955; Towards a standardisation of laboratory methods. 2nd report of the Subcommittee of laboratory methods of the International Union against Tuberculosis. Bull. int. Un. Tuberc 25:89
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Koelbel H. 1957 Über einige Probleme der Morphologie und Cytologie des Mycobacterium tuberculosis Jahresbericht Börstel 1956 57 p 252 Berlin: Springer Verlag;
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Lack C. H., Tanner F. 1953; The significance of pleomorphism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis var. hominis. J. gen. Microbiol 8:18
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Langeron M., Vanbreuseghem R. 1952 Précis de Mycologie, 2nd ed. pp 320593 Paris: Masson and Cie;
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Mackie McCartney's Handbook of Bacteriology 1960. Ed. by Cruickshank R. pp 112118–215 Edinburgh and London: Livingstone;
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Rosenthal S. R., Heagan B. 1955; Studies of the life cycle of the tubercle bacillus (BCG). Ann. Inst. Pasteur 88:479
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Runyon E. H. 1959; Anonymous mycobacteria in pulmonary disease. Med. Clin. N. Amer 43:273
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Skinner C. E., Emmons C. W., Tsuchiya H. M. 1947 HenricVs moulds, yeasts and actinomycetes p 354 London: Chapman and Hall;
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Tuberculosis Chemotherapy Centre, Madras 1959. A concurrent comparison of home and sanatorium treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in South India Bull. Wld Hlth Org 21:144
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Waksman S. A., Henrici A. T. 1943; The nomenclature and classification of the actinomycetes. J. Bad 46:337
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Waksman S. A. 1950 The Actinomycetes p 57 Waltham, Mass., U.S.A.: Chronica Botanica Company;
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Xalabarder C. 1954 El origen del Bacilo de Koch p 92 Barcelona: Inst. Anti-tuberculoso ‘Francisco Moragas’;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-26-1-97
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-26-1-97
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error