1887

Abstract

encodes a PAK kinase that is involved in morphogenesis and cell integrity. Both over- and underexpressing conditions of affected cell wall composition. Kic1-deficient cells were hypersensitive to the cell wall perturbing agent calcofluor white and had less 1,6-β-glucan. When Kic1-deficient cells were crossed with various mutants, which also have less 1,6-β-glucan in their wall, the double mutants displayed synthetic growth defects. However, when crossed with the 1,3-β-glucan-deficient strain Δ, no synthetic growth defect was observed, supporting a specific role for in regulating 1,6-β-glucan levels. Kic1-deficient cells also became highly resistant to the cell wall-degrading enzyme mixture Zymolyase, and exhibited higher transcript levels of the cell wall protein-encoding genes and . Conversely, overexpression of resulted in increased sensitivity to Zymolyase and in a higher level of 1,6-β-glucan. Multicopy suppressor analysis of a Kic1-deficient strain identified . Consistent with this, expression levels of correlated with 1,6-β-glucan levels in the cell wall. Interestingly, expression levels of and the MAP kinase kinase had opposite effects on Zymolyase sensitivity of the cells and on cell wall 1,6-β-glucan levels in the wall. It is proposed that Kic1 affects cell wall construction in multiple ways and in particular in regulating 1,6-β-glucan levels in the wall.

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2002-12-01
2020-01-22
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