1887

Abstract

’ is capable of growth with butane via the oxidation of butane to 1-butanol, which is catalysed by a soluble butane monooxygenase (sBMO). oxidation of ethylene (an alternative substrate for sBMO) was reconstituted in the soluble portion of cell extracts and was NADH-dependent. Butane monooxygenase was separated into three components which were obligately required for substrate oxidation. The N-terminal sequences of the peptides associated with butane monooxygenase led to the cloning and sequencing of the 5797 nucleotide gene cluster. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences with other multicomponent monooxygenases suggest that sBMO is a multimeric hydroxylase with 61, 45 and 19 kDa subunits encoded by , a 40 kDa oxidoreductase encoded by , and a 15 kDa regulatory protein encoded by . A sixth structural gene () encodes a 96 kDa protein with similarity exclusively to (), a putative metal centre assembly protein of the soluble methane monooxygenases. Insertional inactivation of resulted in a mutant ‘’ strain incapable of growth with butane. A putative promoter element characteristic of promoters associated with σ-dependent transcription initiation was located upstream of the genes. Expression of all six genes was detected in butane-induced cells. Butane monooxygenase from ‘’ aligns most closely with non-haem carboxylate-bridged diiron monooxygenases and, moreover, contains the characteristic iron-binding motif. The structural and mechanistic implications of the high sequence identity (up to 64%) between the peptides of butane monooxygenase and methane monooxygenases are discussed.

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2002-11-01
2019-10-22
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