1887

Abstract

TA441 degrades phenol by a -cleavage pathway after the occurrence of a spontaneous mutation that derepresses the operon encoding phenol hydroxylase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, the enzymes for the initial two steps of the degradation pathway. A gene cluster, , encoding the -pathway enzymes for degradation of 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (HMS) to TCA cycle intermediates was found downstream of the operon. The upstream operon and the downstream gene cluster were found to be separated by two open reading frames of unknown function and an oppositely oriented gene, which is similar to regulatory genes for -cleavage of catechol or chlorinated catechols. A promoter assay using an :: transcriptional fusion plasmid revealed that the promoter activity is induced by both phenol and HMS. The phenol-dependent induction was mediated by AphR and the HMS-dependent induction was mediated by AphT. The promoter in strain TA441 was not silenced, unlike the cases of the and promoters, and was highly induced by HMS.

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2000-07-01
2020-04-07
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