1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Fingerprinting by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was compared with existing molecular typing systems for Fifteen isolates were chosen, including three from the same patient; these gave 14 distinct karyotypes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and 7 different DNA types by RI-generated restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). RAPD with primer I (5' GCT GGT GG3') gave 5 types, whereas primer II (5' GCG CAC GG3') yielded 11 types. Combining the results from both primers, all isolates were unique by RAPD with the exception of the three from the same patient. RAPD provided a fast, economical and reproducible means of typing with a level of discrimination approaching that of PFGE.

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1993-09-01
2021-10-20
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