1887

Abstract

A number of strains of halophilic archaeobacteria of the genera and were able to grow anaerobically using fumarate as electron acceptor. The species showing the best anaerobic growth with fumarate were and The two species tested did not show anaerobic growth enhancement with fumarate. During anaerobic growth of in the presence of fumarate, succinate accumulated in the medium with a stoichiometry of only 0-16-0-23 mmol succinate per mmol fumarate consumed; this can be explained by the use of succinate for assimilatory purposes. The ability to reduce fumarate to succinate did not correlate with the ability to grow anaerobically using nitrate, dimethylsulphoxide or trimethylamine -oxide as terminal electron acceptors. Anaerobic respiration with fumarate as electron acceptor supplies the halophilic archaeobacteria with an additional mode of energy generation in the absence of molecular oxygen.

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1991-06-01
2021-08-02
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