1887

Abstract

Summary: Intact, non-growing and oxidized a wide range of 1-C-labelled fatty acids (C to C) to CO. Laurate (C) was oxidized most rapidly, and its oxidation by was inhibited by the antileprosy agents Dapsone, clofazamine and rifampicin. Key enzymes of β-oxidation were detected in extracts from all three mycobacteria. All these activities (both in intact mycobacteria and the enzymes) were stimulated in grown in Dubos medium plus palmitate but activities in or grown either in Dubos medium with added liposomes or triolein, or were similar to those detected in the same strain grown in Dubos medium alone. could be grown in medium in which 95% of its fatty acyl elongase activity is acetyl-CoA dependent. In this medium growing organisms oxidized [1-C]palmitate to CO but simultaneously elongated palmitate to C acids and even longer. Acetyl-CoA-dependent elongase activity is similar but clearly not identical to reversed β-oxidation, but the exact point(s) of difference have not yet been identified.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-4-885
1991-04-01
2021-04-19
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/137/4/mic-137-4-885.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-4-885&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Barclay R., Wheeler P. R. 1989; Metabolism of mycobacteria in tissues. The Biology of the Mycobacteria, 337–106 Ratledge C., Stanford J., Grange J. M. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Binstock J. R., Schulz H. 1981; Fatty acid oxidation complex from Escherichia coli. Methods in Enzymology 71:403–411
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Camargo E. E., Wagner H. N. Jr 1987; Radiometric studies on the oxidation of [1-l4C]fatty acids and [U-14C]L-amino acids by mycobacteria. Nuclear Medicine and Biology 14:43–49
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Camargo E. E., Kertcher J. A., Larson S. M., Tepper B. S., Wagner H. N. Jr. 1979; Radiometric measurement of differential metabolism of fatty acids by Mycobacterium lepraemurium. International Journal of Leprosy 41:126–132
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Chadwick M. V. 1982 Mycobacteria. Institute for Medical Laboratory Sciences Monographs Bristol: P. S. G. Wright;
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Colquhoun D. 1971; Numerical and rank measurements. Lectures on Biostatistics137–151 Oxford: Clarendon Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Finnerty W. R. 1989; Microbial lipid metabolism. Microbial Lipids, 2525–566 Ratledge C., Wilkinson S. G. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Franzblau S. G. 1988; Oxidation of palmitic acid by Mycobacterium leprae in an axenic medium. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 26:18–21
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Franzblau S. G., Harris E. B., Hastings R. C. 1987; Axenic incorporation of [U-14C]palmitic acid into the phenolic glycolipid-I of Mycobacterium leprae. FEMS Microbiology Letters 48:407–411
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Fujita Y., Shimikata T., Kusaka T. 1980; Purification of two forms of enoyl-CoA hydratase from Mycobacterium smegmatis. Journal of Biochemistry 88:1045–1050
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Heifets L. B., Iseman M. D., Cook J. L., Lindholm-Levy P. J., Drupa I. 1985; Determination of in vitro susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to cephalosporins by radiometric and conventional methods. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 27:11–15
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Ishaque M. 1989; Direct evidence for the oxidation of palmitic acid by host grown Mycobacterium leprae. Research in Microbiology 140:83–93
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kikuchi S., Kusaka T. 1984; Purification of NADPH-dependent enoyl-CoA reductase involved in the malonyl-CoA dependent fatty acid elongation system of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Journal of Biochemistry 96:841–848
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Kondo E., Suzuki K., Kanai K., Yasuda T. 1985; Liposomes- mycobacteria incubation systems as a partial model of host-parasite interaction at cell membrane level. Japanese Journal of Medical Science and Biology 38:169–180
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Kusaka T. 1977; Fatty acid synthesizing enzyme activity of cultured Mycobacterium lepraemurium. International Journal of Leprosy 45:132–144
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Lowrie D. B. 1983; Mononuclear phagocyte-mycobacterium interaction. The Biology of the Mycobacteria, 2235–278 Ratledge C., Stanford J. London: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  17. McCarthy C. 1984; Free fatty acid and triglyceride content of Mycobacterium avium cultured under different growth conditions. American Review of Respiratory Disease 129:96–100
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Minnikin D. E., Hutchinson I. G., Caldicott A. B. 1980; Chromatography of methanolysates of mycolic acid containing mycobacteria. Journal of Chromatography 188:221–233
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Mizugaki M., Nishimaki T., Shiraishi T., Yamanaka H. 1982; Studies on metabolism of unsaturated fatty acids. VII. Separation and general properties of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent trans-2-enoyl-coenzyme-CoA reductase from Escherichia coli K-12. Chemical Pharmacology Bulletin 30:2503–2511
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Mukherjee R. M., Antia N. H. 1985; Intracellular multiplication of leprosy-derived mycobacteria in Schwann cells of dorsal root ganglian cultures. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 21:208–212
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Nishimaki-Mogami T., Yamanaka H., Mizugaki M. 1987; Involvement of the fatty acid oxidation complex in acetyl-CoA- dependent chain elongation of fatty acids in Escherichia coli. Journal of Biochemistry 102:427–432
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Nunn W. D. 1986; A molecular view of fatty acid catabolism in Escherichia coli. Microbiological Reviews 50:179–192
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Schulz R. 1974; Long chain enoyl-CoA hydratase from pig heart. Journal of Biological Chemistry 249:2704–2709
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Shimikata T., Fujita Y., Kusaka T. 1980; Involvement of one or two enoyl-CoA hydratase and enoyl-CoA reductase in the acetyl- CoA-dependent elongation of medium chain fatty acids by Mycobacterium smegmatis. Journal of Biochemistry 88:1051–1058
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Wheeler P. R. 1984; Oxidation of carbon sources through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Mycobacterium leprae grown in armadillo liver. Journal of General Microbiology 130:381–389
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Wheeler P. R. 1987; Biosynthesis and scavenging of purines by pathogenic mycobacteria including Mycobacterium leprae. Journal of General Microbiology 133:2999–3011
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Wheeler P. R., Ratledge C. 1988; Use of carbon sources for lipid biosynthesis in Mycobacterium leprae: a comparison with other pathogenic mycobacteria. Journal of General Microbiology 134:2111–2121
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Wheeler P. R., Bharadwaj V. P., Gregory D. 1982; N-Acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase in Mycobacterium leprae. Journal of General Microbiology 128:1063–1071
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Wheeler P. R., Bulmer K., Ratledge C. 1990; Enzymes for biosynthesis de novo and elongation of fatty acids in mycobacteria : is Mycobacterium leprae competent in fatty acid biosynthesis?. Journal of General Microbiology 136:211–217
    [Google Scholar]
  30. World Health Organization 1980 UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases. Report of the fifth Meeting on the Immunology of Leprosy (IMMLEP) TDR/IMMLEP-SWG (5)/80.3, Annex 4, p. 23. Geneva: World Health Organization;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-4-885
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-137-4-885
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error