1887

Abstract

The obligately methylotrophic bacterium hydrolyses aliphatic amides to ammonia and aliphatic acid using a cytoplasmic amidase. Physiological regulation of amidase activity was investigated by growing the organism under various conditions in batch, fed-batch and continuous culture. The results showed that synthesis of the enzyme was induced by various amides (acrylamide > acetamide) and repressed by ammonia. Growth of the wild-type organism in acetamide-limited continuous culture at very low dilution rate ( 0·025 h) led to the selection of a hyperactive strain (MM6), the subsequent growth of which under acrylamide limitation led to the selection of another strain (MM8) which showed even higher activity. The amidase activities of strains MM6 and MM8 were respectively approximately four and twelve times higher than that of the wild-type organism following growth under similar conditions, whereas the concentrations of the enzyme as determined by SDS-PAGE and scanning densitometry were approximately four times higher than the wild-type organism in both strains. The amidase in strain MM8 exhibited a for acrylamide that was approximately one-third lower than that of the wild-type organism or of strain MM6. It is concluded that the hyperactivity of strain MM6 was due predominantly to the production of more wild-type enzyme, whilst the hyperactivity of strain MM8 was due to the production of approximately the same amount of enzyme as strain MM6 (up to 25% of the total cell protein depending on the nature of the limiting amide) but with a substantially enhanced catalytic activity ( ). These changes were apparently the result of spontaneous mutations that occurred in response to growth at extremely low amide concentrations, giving the novel strains a strong selective advantage under these conditions (possibly by enhancing the rate of diffusion of amide into the cell).

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1989-11-01
2021-07-23
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