1887

Abstract

Four coryneform bacteria were isolated from enrichments with 1-chlorobutane, 1-chloropentane or 1-chlorohexane as sole source of carbon and energy. One organism, strain HA1, was identified as an sp. It could utilize at least 18 1-chloro-, 1-bromo- and 1-iodoalkanes, but not the 1-fluoroalkane tested. Substrate utilization was quantitative and growth yields of about 5.5 g protein (mol C) were observed for hexanol and 1-chlorohexane with specific growth rates of 0·19 and 0·14 h, respectively. The organohalogen atom was released quantitatively as the halide ion. Cells grown on 1-chlorobutane contained an inducible enzyme(s) that dehalogenated haloalkanes. The enzyme was soluble, required no cofactors, membrane components or oxygen for activity, and released halide and the corresponding n-alcohol from the 1-haloalkane. The halidohydrolase(s) in crude extract had a specific activity of about 0·7 mkat (kg protein) and dehalogenated a much wider spectrum of compounds (at least 29, including mid-chain and α,ω-dichlorosubstituted alkanes) than supported growth.

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1987-02-01
2022-01-25
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