1887

Abstract

Summary: Patterns of translation products from isolated mRNA and polypeptide accumulation in synchronized cultures of were analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The way in which the availability of silicon, the specific cell cycle stage, or the illumination conditions affected the pattern of gene expression was distinguished by comparing the timing of polypeptide and mRNA accumulation in cultures synchronized by two different methods. A rapid and dramatic shift in the relative abundance of translation products from mRNA followed either the removal or the readdition of silicate to the media as well as the transition from dark to light. Eleven mRNAs appeared to be expressed specifically between mid-S phase and cell separation, as their increase was observed at this stage in both synchronies. In addition, three mildly acidic polypeptides from the soluble protein fraction of , each representing about 0·05% of the total protein, increased several-fold between mid-S and cell separation. Thus, silicon appears to affect gene expression both directly and, due to its effect on cell cycle progression, indirectly. Both effects are primarily at a level before translation.

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1985-07-01
2022-01-17
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