1887

Abstract

Cell surface hydrophobicity of group A, B, C, D and G streptococcal strains has been studied and compared in a new test based on the fact that the degree of bacterial aggregation in ammonium sulphate depends on amphiphilic surface antigens. M-positive group A strains showing good growth in normal human blood aggregated in the standard salt aggregation test at very low concentrations of ammonium sulphate, while M-negative strains, which were killed in normal human blood, usually aggregated at high salt concentrations. Agents such as 2 -KSCN, 2 -guanidine. HCl or 2 -urea decreased the aggregation of the M-positive strains in the salt aggregation test while non ionic detergents such as Tween 20 (1%, w/v) and ethylene glycol (2 ) did not affect cell aggregation. Binding of fibrinogen and albumin resulted in a decrease of surface hydrophobicity of the group A M-positive strains. Group B strains possess a hydrophilic surface character and did not aggregate, while group C and G strains behaved in the salt aggregation test like M-negative strains of group A streptococci. Group D strains did not aggregate even at high ammonium salt concentrations. The results are discussed in relation to the influence of lipoteichoic acid and other surface antigens on strains of the various groups, and it is suggested that M protein and possibly also other surface proteins contribute to the high surface hydrophobicity of group A strains.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-130-3-657
1984-03-01
2021-10-21
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/130/3/mic-130-3-657.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-130-3-657&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Beachey E. H., Simpson W. A., Ofek I. 1980; Interaction of surface polymers of Streptococcus pyogenes with animal cells. In Microbial Adhesion to Surfaces pp. 389–405 Berkeley R. C. W., Lynch J. M., Melling J., Rutter P. R., Vincent B. Edited by Chichester: Ellis Horwood;
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Beachey E. H., Stollerman G. H., Chiang E. Y., Chiang T. M., Seyer J. M., Kang A. H. 1977; Purification and properties of M protein extracted from group A streptococci with pepsin: covalent structure of the amino terminal region of type 24 M antigen. Journal of Experimental Medicine 145:1469–1483
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Björck L., Tylewska S. K., Wadström T., Kronvall G. 1981; β2-microglobulin is bound to streptococcal M protein. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology 13:391–394
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Faris A., Wadström T., Freer J. 1981; Hydrophobic adsorptive and hemagglutinating properties of Escherichia coli possessing cononization factor antigens (CFA/I or CFA/II), type 1 pili, or other pili. Current Microbiology 5:67–72
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Hanstein W. G. 1979; Chaotropic ions and their interactions with proteins. Journal of Solid Phase Biochemistry 4:189–195
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Helenius A., Simons K. 1975; Solubilization of membranes by detergents. Biochimica et biophysica acta 415:29–79
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Hjertén S. 1981; Hydrophobic interaction chromatography of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and cells on non-charged amphiphilic gels. Methods of Biochemical Analysis 27:89–108
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Jennings H. J., Rosell K. G., Kasper D. L. 1980; Structure of the native polysaccharide antigen of type la group B streptococcus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 77:2931–2935
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Jonsson P., Wadström T. 1983; High surface hydrophobicity of Staphylococcus aureus as revealed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Current Microbiology 8:347–353
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Kantor F. S. 1965; Fibrinogen precipitation by streptococcal M protein. I. Identity of the reactants and stoichiometry of the reaction. Journal of Experimental Medicine 121:849–859
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kjelleberg S., Lagerkrantz C., Larsson T. 1980; Quantitative analysis of bacterial hydrophobicity studied by the binding of dodecanoicacid. FEMS Microbiology Letters 7:41–44
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Köhler W., Prokop O. 1978; Relationship between haptoglobin and Streptococcus pyogenes T4 antigens. Nature, London 271:373–375
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kronvall G., Schönbeck C. H., Myhre E. 1979a; Fibrinogen binding structures in β-haemolytic streptococci of groups A, C, and G. Acta pathologica et microbiologica scandinavica B87:303–310
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Kronvall G., Simmons A., Myhre E. 1979b; Specific adsorption of human albumin, immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin G with selected strains of group A and G streptococci. Infection and Immunity 25:1–10
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Kühnemund O., Havlicek J., Schmidt K. H., Wadström T., Köhler W. 1982; Relationship of M protein to hydrophobic properties of streptococcal cells. In Basic Concepts of Streptococci and Streptococcal Diseases p. 82 Holm S. E., Christensen P. Edited by Chertsey; Reedbooks;
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Lancefield R. C. 1938; A microprecipitin technique for classifying haemolytic streptococci, and improved methods for producing antisera. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 38:473–478
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Lancefield R. C. 1957; Differentiation of group A streptococci with a common R antigen into three serological types with special reference to the bactericidal test. Journal of Experimental Medicine 106: p. 525
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Lancefield R. C. 1959; Persistence of type-specific antibodies in man following infection with group A streptococci. Journal of Experimental Medicine 110:271–278
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Lindahl M., Faris A., Wadström T., Hjertén S. 1981; A new test based on ‘salting out’ to measure relative surface hydrophobicity of bacterial cells. Biochimica et biophysica acta 677:471–476
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Magnusson K. E., Stendahl O., Tagesson C., Edebo L., Johansson G. 1977; The tendency of smooth and rough Salmonella typhimurium bacteria and iipopolysaccharide to hydrophobic and ionic interaction as studied in aqueous polymer two phase systems. Acta pathologica et microbiologica scandinaitea B85:212–218
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Miörner H., Myhre E., Björck L., Kronvall G. 1980; Effect of specific binding of human albumin, fibrinogen and immunoglobulin G on surface characteristics of bacterial strains as revealed by partition experiments in polymer two phase systems. Infection and Immunity 29:879–885
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Myhre E. B., Kronvall G. 1980; Demonstration of specific binding sites for human serum albumin in group C and G streptococci. Infection and Immunity 27:6–14
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Van Oss C., Gillman C. F. 1972; Phagocytosis as a surface phenomenon. I. Contact angles and phagocytosis of nonopsonized bacteria. Journal of the Reticuloendothelial Society 12:283–292
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Schmidt K. H., Köhler W. 1981; Interaction of streptococcal cell wall components with fibrinogen. I. Communication: adsorption of fibrinogen by immobilized T proteins of Streptococcus pyogenes. Immunobiology 158:330–337
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Simpson W. A., Ofek I., Beachey E. H. 1980; Binding of Streptococcus lipoteichoic acid to the fatty acid binding sites on serum albumin. Journal of Biological Chemistry 255:6092–6097
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Smyth C. J., Jonsson P., Olsson E., Sǒderlind O., Rosengren J., Hjertén S., Wadström T. 1978; Differences in hydrophobic surface characteristics of porcine enteropathogenic Escherichia coli with or without K88 antigen as revealed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Infection and Immunity 22:462–472
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Šramek J. 1977; Bactericidal test for measurement of type specific (anti-M) antibodies to group A streptococci. Standard Technique of WHO Collaboration Center for Reference and Research on Streptococci pp. 1–4 Prague: Institute of Hygiene & Epidemiology;
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Stollerman G. H., Kantor F. S., Gordon D. B. 1958; Accessory plasma factors involved in the bactericidal test for type specific antibody to group A streptococci. I. Atypical behaviour of some human and rabbit bloods. Journal of Experimental Medicine 108:475–491
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Tillett W. S., Garner R. L. 1934; The agglutination of hemolytic streptococci by plasma and fibrinogen. Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital 54:145–156
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Tylewska S. K., Hjertén S., Wadström T. 1979; Contribution of the hydrophobic surface properties of Streptococcus pyogenes. FEMS Microbiology Letters 6:249–253
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Wadström T., Hjertén S., Jonsson P., Tylewska S. K. 1981; Hydrophobic surface properties of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus sapro- phyticus and Streptococcus pyogenes: a comparative study. In Staphylococci and Staphylococcal Infections pp. 441–447 Jeljaszewicz J. Edited by Stuttgart: Gustav Fischer;
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Wicken A. J., Knox K. W. 1980; Bacterial cell surface amphiphiles. Biochimica et biophysica acta 604:1–26
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-130-3-657
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-130-3-657
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error