1887

Abstract

The effects were studied of increasing concentrations of bentonite clay on the interactions between the fungal pathogen var. and two bacterial antagonists. Clay increased the growth rate of this increase was statistically significant, though small, and could have been due to an effect on water availability. The effectiveness of one of the bacterial culture nitrates in restricting the fungal growth was reduced by the clay, though antagonism was maintained in the presence of bacterial cells. The clay may adsorb some of the bacterial toxins, and lowered water availability may increase bacterial antagonism before it significantly reduces fungal growth. Antagonism by the other bacterium was not affected by clay.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-129-3-771
1983-03-01
2022-01-23
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