1887

Abstract

The glycolipoprotein (GLP) extracted from the surface slime of produces effects in mice similar to those of the viable cell. The lethal activity has been located in the lipid moiety; however, degradation of the carbohydrate moiety with sodium metaperiodate reduced the antigenicity and abolished the lethality of the GLP. Similar degradation with a phage-induced polysaccharide depolymerase reduced the antigenicity only slightly but reduced the lethality over 60%. The neutral sugar composition of the isolated polysaccharide moiety was shown to be that of the parental GLP. Of the component neutral sugars, mannose and its derivatives were capable of inhibiting the agglutination of erythrocytes coated with GLP. Inhibition also occurred with a soluble mannose polymer from the cell walls of yeast. Antiserum to GLP and to its isolated polysaccharide moiety agglutinated yeast cells, whereas antiserum to a glycolipid fragment of the GLP lacking mannose did not. The lethality of the GLP was reduced by degradation with -mannosidase or by blocking the mannose residues with concanavalin A, and the glycolipid fragment showed less lethality than the native GLP. We conclude that mannose, in addition to being an immunodominant sugar, is an effector sugar in the expression of GLP lethality.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-128-11-2631
1982-11-01
2021-10-23
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/128/11/mic-128-11-2631.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-128-11-2631&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bartell P. F., Orr T. E., Lam G. K. H. 1966; Polysaccharide depolymerase associated with bacteriophage infection. Journal of Bacteriology 92:56–62
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bartell P. F., Orr T. E., Chudio B. 1970; Purification and chemical composition of the protective slime antigen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection and Immunity 2:543–548
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Batson H. C. 1956 An Introduction to Statistics in the Medical Sciences Minneapolis: Burgess Publishing Co;
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Castillo F. J., Bartell P. F. 1974; Studies on the bacteriophage 2 receptor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Journal of Virology 14:904–909
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Coligan J. E., Fraser B. A., Kindt T. J. 1978; Immunochemistry of streptococcal group C polysaccharide and the nature of its cross-reaction with the Forssman glycolipid. Progress in Clinical Biology Research 23:601–612
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Doggett R. G. editor 1979 Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Clinical Manifestations of Infection and Current Therapy New York: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Fenson A. H., Gray G. W. 1969; The chemical composition of the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biochemical Journal 114:185–196
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Freimer N. B., Ögmundsdottir H. M., Blackwell C. C., Sutherland I. W., Graham L., Weir D. M. 1978; The role of cell wall carbohydrates in binding of microorganisms to mouse peritoneal exudate macrophages. Acta patho/ogica et microhiologica scandanavica B86:53–57
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Gilboa-Garber N., Mizraki L. 1981; Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectin to Rhizohium sp. Journal of Applied Bacteriology 50:21–28
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Haynes W. C. 1951; Pseudomonas aeruginosa- its characterization and identification. Journal of General Microbiology 5:939–950
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Koepp L. H., Orr T., Bartell P. F. 1981a; Polysaccharide of the slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection and Immunity 33:788–794
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Koepp L. H., Orr T., Bartell P. F. 1981b; The lethal moiety of the surface slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Current Microbiology 6:383–388
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kozel T. R., Cazin J. Jr 1974; Induction of humoral antibody response by soluble polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans. Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata 54:21–30
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lynn M., Sensakovic J. W., Bartell P. F. 1977; In vivo distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa slime glycolipoprotein association with leukocytes. Infection and Immunity 15:109–114
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Maisch P. A., Calderone R. A. 1981; Role of surface mannose in the adherence of Candida albicans to fibrin-platelet clots formed in vitro. Infection and Immunity 32:92–97
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Ofek I., Beachey E. H., Sharon N. 1978; Surface sugars of animal cells as determinants of recognition in bacterial adherence. Trends in Biochemical Science 3:159–160
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Phaff H. J. 1963; Cell wall of yeasts. Annual Review of Microbiology 17:15–30
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Reed L. J., Muench H. 1938; A simple method of estimating fifty percent end points. American Journal of Hygiene 27:493–497
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Sensakovic J. W., Bartell P. F. 1974; The slime of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: biological characterization of possible role in experimental infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases 129:101–109
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Sensakovic J. W., Bartell P. F. 1975; Biological activity of fragments derived from the extracellular slime glycolipoprotein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection and Immunity 12:808–812
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Sharon N., Lis H. 1972; Lectins: cell-agglutinating and sugar-specific proteins. Science 177:949–959
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Spiro R. G. 1966; Analysis of sugars found in glycoproteins. Methods in Enzymology 18:26–52
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Spiro R. G. 1972; Study of the carbohydrate of glycoproteins. Methods in Enzymology 28:3–43
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-128-11-2631
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-128-11-2631
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error