1887

Abstract

Cell monolayer-grown chlamydiae (CGO) differed from egg-grown organisms (EGO) in their increased spontaneous infectivity relative to centrifuge-assisted infectivity for mono-layers. For each population spontaneous: centrifuge-assisted infectivity ratios were constant over a wide dose range. Spontaneous infection increased linearly with time and could not be exhausted from either population by prolonged adsorption; there was no change in infectivity ratios in residual supernatants. Further, one passage of EGO through monolayers gave CGO with stable infectivity properties not increased by further cell passage yet reverting on a single passage in eggs. Spontaneous infection of monolayers with EGO gave progeny with the same infectivity ratios as monolayers infected with EGO by centrifugation. The change in properties following EGO infection of monolayers occurred prior to natural release from cells. We conclude that EGO and CGO are two phenotypically distinct, homogeneous populations. The two infection modes are not properties of subpopulations within EGO and CGO. The relationship of these observations on chlamydiae to other possible host-imposed phenomena is considered.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-112-1-53
1979-05-01
2022-07-06
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/112/1/mic-112-1-53.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-112-1-53&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Allan I., Pearce J. H. 1977; Serum modulation of cell susceptibility to chlamydial infection. FEMS Microbiology Letters 1:211–214
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Allan I., Pearce J. H. 1979a; Modulation by centrifugation of cell susceptibility to chlamydial infection. Journal of General Microbiology 111:87–92
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Allan I., Pearce J. H. 1979b; Host modification of chlamydiae: presence of an egg antigen on the surface of chlamydiae grown in the chick embryo. Journal of General Microbiology 112:61–66
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Collier L. H. 1962; Growth characteristics of inclusion blennorrhea virus in cell cultures. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 98:42–49
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Doughri A. M., Storz J., Altera K. P. 1972; Mode of entry and release of chlamydiae in infections Of intestinal epithelial cells. Journal of Infectious Diseases 126:652–657
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Gordon F. B., Harper I. A., Quan A. L., Treharne J. D., Dwyer R. St. C., Garland J. A. 1969; Detection of chlamydia (bedsonia) in certain infections of man. I. Laboratory procedures: comparison of yolk sac and cell culture for detection and isolation. Journal of Infectious Diseases 120:451–462
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Gordon F. B., Nichols R. L., Quan A. L. 1971; Immunotyping of Chlamydia Trachomatis with fluorescent antibody: retention of immunospecificity in cell culture passage, and typing with infected cell monolayers. In Trachoma and Related Disorders pp. 358–362 Edited by Nichols R. L. Amsterdam: Excerpta Medica;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Griffiths M. S., Ainsworth S. A., Pearce J. H. 1976; Infectivity titration of guinea-pig inclusion conjunctivitis agent in irradiated mccoy cells. Journal of General Microbiology 95:249–256
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Howard L., Orenstein N. S., King N. W. 1974; Purification on renografin density Gradients Of Chlamydia Trachomatis grown in the yolk sac of eggs. Applied Microbiology 27:102–106
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Jenkin H. M. 1966; The continuous passage of agents of trachoma in cell culture 1. characteristics of TW-3 and Bour strains of trachoma Cultivated in serial passage in HeLa cells. Journal of Infectious Diseases 116:390–399
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kordova N., Poffenroth L., Wilt J. C. 1972; Lysosomes and the ‘Toxicity’ of rickettsiales. III. Response of L cells infected with egg-attenuated C. psittaci strain 6BC. Canadian Journal of Microbiology 18:1343–1348
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Kuo C. C., Wang S. P., Grayston J. T. 1975; Comparative infectivity of trachoma organisms in hela 229 cells and egg cultures. Infection and Immunity 12:1078–1082
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Mitsui Y., Fujimoto M., Kajima M. 1964; Development and morphology of trachoma agent in the yolk sac cell as revealed by electron microscopy. Virology 23:30–45
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Mitsui Y., Kitamuro T., Fujimoto M. 1967; Adaption of tric agents to tissue culture and characteristics of tissue culture adapted variants. American Journal Of Ophthalmology 63:1191–1205
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Moore J. E., Griffiths M. S., Pearce J. H. 1970; Virulence of trachoma-inclusion conjunctivitis agent after passage in baboons. British Journal of Experimental Pathology 51:298–304
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Moore J. E., Griffiths M. S., Pearce J. H. 1974; Chlamydial infection of conjunctival tissues in culture. British Journal of Experimental Pathology 55:396–405
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Reeve P., Taverne J. 1962; A simple method for total particle counts of trachoma and inclusion blennorrhoea viruses. Nature, London 195:923–924
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Taverne J., Blyth W. A., Reeve P. 1964; Toxicity of the agents of trachoma and inclusion conjunctivitis. Journal of General Microbiology 37:271–275
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-112-1-53
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-112-1-53
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error