1887

Abstract

causes gastroenteritis with a variety of symptoms in humans. In the absence of a suitable animal model, models have been used to study virulence traits such as invasion and toxin production. In this study, 113 isolates from poultry and poultry-related (=74) environments as well as isolates from human cases (=39) of campylobacteriosis and bacteraemia were tested for invasiveness using INT 407 cells. The method was sufficiently reproducible to observe a spectrum of invasiveness amongst strains. As a result, strains were classified as low, high and hyper-invasive. The majority of strains (poultry and human) were low invaders (82 % and 88 %, respectively). High invasion was found for 5 % of human strains and 11 % of poultry-related isolates. However, only 1 % of poultry strains were classified as hyperinvasive compared to 13 % of human isolates (=0.0182). Of those isolates derived from the blood of bacteraemic patients, 20 % were hyperinvasive, though this correlation was not statistically significant. An attempt was made to correlate invasiveness with the presence of seven genes previously reported to be associated with virulence. Most of these genes did not correlate with invasiveness, but gene was weakly over-represented, and a negative correlation was observed for the gene . This trend was stronger when the two genes were analysed together, thus was over-represented in high and hyperinvasive strains, with low invaders more commonly found to lack these genes (=0.0064).

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2008-05-01
2019-09-15
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