1887

Abstract

The differential influence of individual amino acids on the growth of versus () was investigated. Certain essential amino acids added in excess at the middle of the infection course resulted in varying degrees of abnormality in the development of the two species. If amino acids were added as early as 2 h post-infection, these effects were even more pronounced. The most effective amino acids in terms of growth inhibition were leucine, isoleucine, methionine and phenylalanine. These amino acids elicited similar effects against , except methionine, which, surprisingly, showed a lower inhibitory activity. Tryptophan and valine marginally inhibited growth and, paradoxically, led to a considerable enhancement of growth. On the other hand, some non-essential amino acids administered at the middle of or throughout the infection course differentially affected the development of the two species. For example, growth was efficiently inhibited by glycine and serine, whereas was relatively less sensitive to these agents. Another difference was apparent for glutamate, glutamine and aspartate, which stimulated growth more than that of . Overall, several distinctive patterns of susceptibility to excess amino acid levels were revealed for two representative and isolates. Perturbation of amino acid levels, e.g. of leucine and isoleucine, might form a basis for the development of novel treatment or preventive regimens for chlamydial diseases.

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2006-07-01
2019-10-20
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