1887

Abstract

The pathogenicity of thermotolerant species, common food-borne pathogens, depends on certain factors unevenly distributed among strains of different origin. The prevalence of such markers has never been examined in a population of Polish strains of human and poultry origin. Therefore, we analysed the presence of the , , and genes and the sequence in ( = 115) and ( = 57) isolates from children with diarrhoea and from chicken carcasses. The gene was present in nearly 100 % of isolates tested, regardless of their origin or species. In contrast, the region was found in 83.3 % and 100 % of isolates from children and chickens, respectively, but in only 1.6 % and 54.7 %, respectively, of isolates. Similarly, the detection rates of genes varied between human and chicken isolates. All three genes were found in nearly all isolates from both children and chickens, but in only 5.6 % of human isolates as compared to 87.2 % of chicken isolates. This different distribution of genetic markers between human and chicken isolates indicates that some infections in children may have additional sources other than contaminated chicken meat.

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2005-07-01
2019-11-17
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