1887

Abstract

Sixty-seven serotype 14 pneumococci, isolated from invasive disease in Scotland during the first 6 months of 2003, were characterized. Serotype 14 pneumococci accounted for 18.2 % of the total number of cases. Serotyping, multilocus sequence typing and antibiotic susceptibility testing revealed 10 different sequence types (STs), predominantly ST 9 and ST 124; most ST 9 pneumococci were erythromycin-resistant whilst those of ST 124 were not.

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2004-11-01
2019-11-12
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