1887

Abstract

The role of in the development and exacerbation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was investigated. Blood samples were taken from 60 JIA patients during an active disease period and for 4 weeks after. Synovial fluid samples were obtained from 20 of the 60 patients. In addition, 22 patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) during the active period and 35 healthy children were included in the study as control groups. Synovial fluid samples were also obtained from three children with FMF. IgG, IgM and IgA levels against in serum samples were studied by immunofluorescence and IgG antibody and PCR studies were performed for DNA in synovial fluid samples. Twenty-nine (48.3 %) patients with JIA, 18 (81.8 %) patients with FMF and 22 (62.8 %) healthy children were found to be pre-infected with . Pre-infection with among FMF patients was found to be significantly higher than among those with JIA. We did not find a significant difference between JIA patients and healthy children. Chronic infection was observed only in six JIA patients, one FMF patient and two healthy children. Synovial fluid antibodies were found at higher than 1/512-fold dilution in one JIA patient and four times higher than normal serum in three JIA patients. DNA was not detected in any synovial fluid sample from FMF or JIA patients by PCR. In conclusion, infection does not have a triggering or a progressive effect on the clinical situation in JIA aetiopathogenesis, as a result of a multifactorial aetiology. New, extensive and serial studies (especially PCR studies of synovial tissue) are needed in order to confirm the indirect results.

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2004-08-01
2019-11-21
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