1887

Abstract

Ninety-five isolates of from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients and 18 from their environment in the intensive-therapy units (ITUs) of four teaching hospitals in Kuwait were typed by PCR amplification of rRNA intergenic spacer regions (PCR ribotyping). A total of 32 different ribotypes was detected among the clinical isolates. The predominant ribotypes from the clinical isolates were types 097 and 078, which accounted for ∼ 40 % of all isolates in the ITUs in Kuwait. Ribotypes 097 (toxigenic), 078 (toxigenic) and 039 (non-toxigenic) were three distinct clones that were circulating in all four hospitals. Ribotypes 097, 078 and 076 (i.e. 50 % of isolates from symptomatic patients) were the predominant isolates associated with -associated disease (CDAD). The environmental isolates belonged to a diverse range of ribotypes, with no particular types common to all the hospitals. Ribotype 078 was found only in the patient environment in Mubarak hospital, while ribotype 097 was restricted to Amiri hospital. The hospital environment occupied by symptomatic as well as symptom-free patients was contaminated with . Eight new strains that did not match any in the PCR ribotype library established at the PHLS Anaerobe Reference Unit, Cardiff, UK, were assigned ribotypes 105, 125, 128, 129, 131, 134, 140 and 141. These findings show that the isolates associated with CDAD in Kuwait are different from those found in the UK and some other European countries.

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2003-08-01
2019-12-06
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