1887

Abstract

is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen capable of acutely infecting or persistently colonizing susceptible hosts. colonizes surfaces by either biofilm formation or swarming motility. The choice of behaviour is influenced by the physical properties of the surface and specific nutrient availability, and subject to regulatory networks that also govern type 2 and type 3 protein secretion. Biofilm formation by clinical isolates has been well-studied. However, the swarming behaviour of human isolates has not been extensively analysed. We collected isolates from 237 hospitalized patients without cystic fibrosis and analysed motility and secretion phenotypes of each isolate. We found biofilm formation and swarming to be negatively associated, while swarming was positively associated with the secretion of both proteases and type 3 exoenzymes. Most isolates were capable of type 3 secretion and biofilm formation, even though these traits are considered to favour distinct modes of pathogenesis. Our data demonstrate that while clinical isolates display diverse motility, biofilm and secretion phenotypes, many of the predicted relationships between swarming motility and other phenotypes observed in laboratory strains also hold true for bacteria isolated from human patients.

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2010-05-01
2019-10-21
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