1887

Abstract

The prompt and specific diagnosis of meningoencephalitis (LMM) is challenging. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an emerging technique for diagnosing infrequent causative pathogens.

We hypothesized that NGS of CSF is an effective approach for diagnosing LMM.

To evaluate the effectiveness of NGS, we present five cases of LMM diagnosed using NGS of the CSF.

Between August 2017 and 30 September 2020, we used NGS of the CSF to detect pathogens in patients with clinically suspected central nervous system infections. The clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, imaging findings and NGS results are reviewed.

Five patients were diagnosed with LMM using NGS of the CSF within 2 to 4 days, although the clinical manifestations, medical history and imaging findings varied strikingly. NGS of CSF showed sequence reads corresponding to species ranging from 118 to 1997 bp, genomic coverage of 0.29–5.96 %, relative abundance of 14.83–32.16 % and sequencing depth of 1.12 to 1.35. The prompt diagnosis resulted in targeted and effective treatment with the appropriate antibiotics, although two patients with the most severe cerebral parenchymal lesions showed little improvement.

Our results demonstrate the power of NGS of CSF for the prompt diagnosis of LMM. NGS of CSF is an important complementary tool for identifying .

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Science and Technology Project for People's Livelihood (Award 20377790D)
    • Principle Award Recipient: HuiBu
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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001641
2023-01-09
2024-03-01
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