1887

Abstract

The Gram-negative bacterium is the causative agent of pleuropneumonia in pigs, its only known natural host. Typical symptoms of peracute disease include fever, apathy and anorexia, and time from infection to death may only be 6 h. Severe lung lesions result from presence of one or two of the ApxI-III toxins. Control is through good husbandry practice, vaccines and antibiotic use. Culture and presence of the species-specific gene by PCR confirms diagnosis, and identification of serovar, of which 19 are known, informs on appropriate vaccine use and epidemiology.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Award BB/S019901/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Award BB/S005897/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: PaulLangford
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Award BB/S002103/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: PaulLangford
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2022-03-09
2022-06-26
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