1887

Abstract

is a highly adept human pathogen. A frequent asymptomatic member of the respiratory microbiota, the pneumococcus has a remarkable capacity to cause mucosal (pneumonia and otitis media) and invasive diseases (bacteremia, meningitis). In addition, the organism utilizes a vast battery of virulence factors for tissue and immune evasion. Though recognized as a significant cause of pneumonia for over a century, efforts to develop more effective vaccines remain ongoing. The pathogen’s inherent capacity to exchange genetic material is critical to the pneumococcus’ success. This feature historically facilitated essential discoveries in genetics and is vital for disseminating antibiotic resistance and vaccine evasion.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities
    • Principle Award Recipient: JasonW Rosch
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Award 1RO1AI110618)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JasonW Rosch
  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Award 1U01AI124302)
    • Principle Award Recipient: JasonW Rosch
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-11-15
2021-12-04
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