1887

Abstract

Carbapenem resistant (CRE) are one of the leading causes of systemic and nosocomial infections and are multidrug-resistant organisms producing different carbapenemases. There are many genotypic and phenotypic methods for detecting the carbapenemases; however, there is a limitation for each. Modified carbapenem inactivation method (mCIM) assay is a recent phenotypic method which has been published by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute.

mCIM assay could provide a reliable method for the detection of carbapenemases in CRE.

Evaluation of the mCIM assay performance for the detection of carbapenemases in and the identification of the common carbapenemase genes at Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia and Kingdom of Bahrain.

A collection of 197 non-duplicate carbapenem resistant clinical isolates, were evaluated with the mCIM test comparing its performance to multiplex PCR. The minimum inhibitory concentration susceptibility testing was done by the Etest method for imipenem, meropenem, and ertapenem.

The sensitivity of the mCIM assay was 94 % (95 % CI, (89.3–97.1)). In Saudi Arabia and Bahrain, OXA-48 was the most prevalent carbapenemase gene followed by NDM. Coexistence of multiple carbapenemase genes is reported in eleven cases.

These findings indicate that the mCIM test is a reliable and simple assay for detecting the activity of carbapenemase in , especially in resource-limited laboratories.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Deanship for Scientific Research at Imam Abdul Rahman Bin Faisal University (Award 222-2018-MED)
    • Principle Award Recipient: ReemY. Aljindan
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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001381
2021-07-07
2021-07-29
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