1887

Abstract

The possible transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes between isolates from humans and different animal species, including those not covered by monitoring programs (e.g. pet and wildlife), poses a serious threat to public health.

Little is known about occurrence and mechanisms of phenomenon of multidrug resistance of isolated from various host species in Poland.

The aim of the study was to characterize multidrug-resistant isolated from humans and animals (livestock, pets and wildlife) in terms of the occurrence of genetic markers determining resistance.

Bacterial isolates were tested for phenotypic resistance and the presence of genes encoding resistance to macrolides, tetracycline, aminoglycosides, aminocyclitols and phenicols as well as efflux pump (A), resolvase (X) and integrase () genes. The quinolone resistance-determining regions of A and C were sequenced.

Human isolates of were characterized by high-level resistance to: ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, erythromycin (100 %), as well, as aminoglycosides resistance (kanamycin – 100%, streptomycin – 78 %, gentamicin – 78%). Regardless of the animal species, high level of resistance of to tetracycline (from 88–100 %), erythromycin (from 82–94 %) and kanamycin (from 36–100 %) was observed. All isolates from wildlife were resistant to fluoroquinolones. However, full susceptibility to vancomycin was observed in all isolates tested. Phenotypic antimicrobial resistance of was identified in the presence of the following resistance genes: (B) (70%), (A) (50 %), (L) (35 %), (K) (34 %), (M) (76 %), (25%), (31%), (68 %), (X) (23 %), and integrase gene () (34 %). A correlation between an amino acid substitution at positions 83 and 87 of A and position 80 of C and the high-level fluoroquinolone resistance in has been observed as well.

The level and range of antimicrobial resistance and the panel of resistance determinants is comparable between isolates, despite host species.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Narodowe Centrum Nauki (Award 2018/02/X/NZ7/ 02853)
    • Principle Award Recipient: AleksandraTrościańczyk
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2021-03-22
2022-01-25
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