1887

Abstract

Micro-organisms use quorum sensing (QS), a cell density-dependent process, to communicate. This QS mode of interchange leads to the production of a variety of virulence factors, co-ordination of complex bacterial behaviours, such as swarming motility, degradation of host tissue and biofilm formation. QS is implicated in numerous human infections and consequently researchers have sought ways of effectively inhibiting the process in pathogenic bacteria. Two decades ago, furanones were the first class of chemical compounds identified as QS inhibitors (QSIs). is a ubiquitous organism, capable of causing a wide range of infections in humans, including eye and ear infections, wound infections and potentially fatal bacteraemia and thus novel treatments against this organism are greatly needed. This review provides a brief background on QS and the use of furanones as QSIs. Based on the effectiveness of action, both and we will explore the use of furanones as potential antimicrobial therapeutics and conclude with open questions.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001144
2020-01-23
2020-02-28
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