1887

Abstract

. Differences between the genomic and virulence profile of circulating strains and vaccine strains are considered as one of the important reasons for the resurgence of whooping cough (pertussis) in the world. Genetically inactivated is one of the new strategies to generate live-attenuated vaccines against whooping cough.

. The aim of this study was to construct a strain based on a predominant profile of circulating Iranian isolates that produces inactivated pertussis toxin (PTX).

. The strain BPIP91 with predominant genomic and virulence pattern was selected from the biobank of the Pasteur Institute of Iran. A BPIP91 derivative with R9K and E129G alterations in the S1 subunit of PTX (S1mBPIP91) was constructed by the site-directed mutagenesis and homologous recombination. Genetic stability and antigen expression of S1mBPIP91 were tested by serially passages and immunoblot analyses, respectively. The reduction in toxicity of S1mBPIP91 was determined by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clustering.

. All constructs and S1mBPIP91 were confirmed via restriction enzyme analysis and DNA sequencing. The engineered mutations in S1mBPIP91 were stable after 20 serial passages. The production of virulence factors was also confirmed in S1mBPIP91. The CHO cell-clustering test demonstrated the reduction in PTX toxicity in S1mBPIP91.

. A of the predominant genomic and virulence lineage in Iran was successfully engineered to produce inactive PTX. This attenuated strain will be useful to further studies to develop both whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccines.

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2019-11-28
2019-12-11
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