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Abstract

Breakthrough bloodstream infections (BSIs) are rare among non-neutropenic patients.

Our goal was to determine the risk factors associated with development of breakthrough BSIs among critically ill non-neutropenic patients and its role in mortality.

During a 24-month period (August 2016 to July 2018), all BSIs among non-neutropenic patients hospitalized at the University General Hospital of Patras, Greece, were included. Antimicrobial resistance of isolates was interpreted according to EUCAST guidelines. BSIs were considered as breakthrough when blood cultures yielded a pathogen in a patient who, for at least the previous 72 h, had been receiving at least one antibiotic to which the isolated microorganism was susceptible.

Among 217 episodes of BSI, 118 (54.4 %) developed a breakthrough infection. Primary BSIs predominated (101; 46.5 %), followed by catheter-related BSIs (56; 25.8 %). Gram-negative bacteria represented the most common pathogens isolated (157; 72.4 %), followed by Gram-positive bacteria (36; 16.6 %) and fungi (36; 16.6 %). Factors independently associated with the development of breakthrough BSIs were immunosuppressive therapy, obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg m ), infection by Gram-positive bacteria, noradrenaline dose during 24 h from BSI onset, prior use of colistin and antifungal treatment. Overall 14-day mortality was 23.0 % (50 patients). Multivariate analysis revealed noradrenaline dose during 24 h from BSI onset as an independent predictor of mortality, while appropriate empiric antimicrobial treatment and breakthrough BSI were identified as predictors of good prognosis.

Breakthrough BSIs were common among critically ill non-neutropenic patients and these patients were associated with better survival because they were receiving appropriate antibiotics.

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2019-10-01
2019-10-15
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