1887

Abstract

. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is dysbiosis associated with an increased risk of several sexually transmitted infections. It is primarily diagnosed via Gram staining, although molecular analyses have presented higher diagnostic accuracy.

. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of BV in asymptomatic women to determine its association with several commensal and pathogenic micro-organisms of the genitalia.

. The prevalence of BV was investigated through semiquantitative assessment of 201 women recruited during their routine gynaecological inspection at an outpatient clinic in Tabasco, Mexico.

. Women with BV showed an increased prevalence of (=0.021) and (=0.001). Of the BV-associated micro-organisms, was significantly associated with (=0.005) and/or (=0.003, whereas and type 1 correlated significantly with (=0.001). No significant association was observed between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and BV, although there was increased prevalence of HPV59, HPV73, HPV52 and HPV58 in women displaying cervical cytological abnormalities.

. Identification of BV-associated micro-organisms via molecular analysis may help to distinguish recurrent cases from new infections and identify micro-organisms potentially associated with pharmacological resistance.

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2019-09-01
2019-09-18
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