1887

Abstract

Invasive early-onset group B infection (EOGBS) is an important cause of severe neonatal complications but study on comprehensive GBS screening is lacking in China. This study aims to investigate the outcome of a regional anterpartum screening program for EOGBS prevention and to estimate the pros and cons of a new GBS screening strategy employed.

We performed an optimized hospital strategy for GBS screening, which targeted expectant mothers (including those with preterm births) from January 2016 to December 2016 in a population-based cohort. Three common screening strategies were simulated to estimate the availability of the hospital strategy used in this study.

Altogether, 9770 eligible women were tested and the rate of GBS carriage was 2.7  % (266/9770). In total, 198 of the 266 maternal GBS carriers accepted intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) treatment. Among the 9860 neonates of 9770 mothers, four cases of EOGBS infection were identified and one case was missed (EOGBS incidence with screening and IAP: 0.5/1000). Risk factors for maternal GBS colonization included preterm birth (between 35 and 37 weeks) [odds ratio (OR)=1.7 (95  % confidence interval: 1.22–2.33)], region of origin, resident areas, maternal age (older than 34 years) [OR=1.5 (1.06–2.09)], prelabour rupture of membranes [OR=1.8 (1.34–2.35)], gestational diabetes mellitus [OR=1.6 (1.14–2.28)] and maternal mild anemia (Hb: 90–110 g dl) [OR=1.5 (1.16–2.06)]. This new screening strategy resulted in less antibiotic exposure and least number of cases missed.

Our findings illustrate that this perinatal screening (including preterm births) for prevention of EOGBS infection can be implemented in the Inner Mongolian area.

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2019-05-01
2020-01-23
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