1887

Abstract

Biofilm formation and resistance to last-line antibiotics have restricted chemotherapy options toward infection eradication.

Fifty isolates were collected from patients with antibiotic-associated haemorrhagic colitis (AAHC). Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted and phenotypic biofilm formation was assessed using microtitre tissue plate (MTP) assay. PCR was employed to amplify the adhesins, extended-spectrum -lactamases (ESBLs), carbapenemase and colistin resistance genes. The expression of adhesin genes was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR).

The previous antibiotic consumption and hospitalization (<0.05) and older ages (=0.0033) were significantly associated with AAHC. None of the isolates produced biofilm strongly, but 70% of them produced moderate-level biofilm. The (12/14), the (8/14 MIC =4 µg ml ) and (5/14) and (4/14) genes were predominant, three of which harbouring all the genes. The expression of (0.023) and (0.011) was significantly different between multidrug-resistant and susceptible isolates. Furthermore, moderately biofilm producer isolates significantly exhibited higher expression of (=.0117), (=0.002) and (=0.020) genes compared to biofilm non-producers. No significant difference regarding gene expression was observed among ESBL alleles.

Bacterial attachment by adhesins and biofilm formation among extensive drug-resistant isolates hinder the efficient infection eradication. Hence, control and surveillance studies should be performed and other therapeutic auspicious approaches must be taken into account against AAHC, biofilm formation and drug resistance spread. Furthermore, previous antibiotic consumption and long-term hospitalization should be controlled.

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2019-07-01
2019-12-08
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