1887

Abstract

Mechanisms underlying systemic infections by oral species of Mitis (, ) and Sanguinis () commensal streptococci are poorly understood. This study investigates profiles of susceptibility to complement-mediated host immunity in representative strains of these four species, which were isolated from oral sites or from the bloodstream.

Deposition of complement opsonins (C3b/iC3b), and surface binding to C-reactive protein (CRP) and to IgG antibodies were quantified by flow cytometry in 34 strains treated with human serum (HS), and compared to rates of opsonophagocytosis by human PMN mediated by complement (CR1/3) and/or IgG Fc (FcγRII/III) receptors.

strains showed reduced susceptibility to complement opsonization and low binding to CRP and to IgG compared to other species. Surface levels of C3b/iC3b in strains were 4.5- and 7.8-fold lower than that observed in and Mitis strains, respectively. Diversity in C3b/iC3b deposition was evident among Mitis species, in which C3b/iC3b deposition was significantly associated with CR/FcγR-dependent opsonophagocytosis by PMN (<0.05). Importantly, and Mitis group strains isolated from systemic infections showed resistance to complement opsonization when compared to oral isolates of the respective species (<0.05).

This study establishes species-specific profiles of susceptibility to complement immunity in Mitis and Sanguinis streptococci, and indicates that strains associated with systemic infections have increased capacity to evade complement immunity. These findings highlight the need for studies identifying molecular functions involved in complement evasion in oral streptococci.

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2019-04-01
2020-01-17
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