1887

Abstract

is the predominant contaminant of platelet concentrates (PCs), a blood product used to treat patients with platelet deficiencies. This microorganism is able to form surface-attached aggregates (biofilms) in human skin. Herein, the abundance of biofilm-producers in contaminated PCs compared to skin isolates was explored. Furthermore, the potential positive selection of biofilm-producers during the blood donation process and PC manufacturing was investigated.

Twenty-four isolates obtained from contaminated PCs and 48 isolates obtained from the venipuncture area of human volunteers were compared for their ability to form biofilms in laboratory media and in PCs using a semi quantitative crystal violet assay. Also, the presence of the biofilm-associated and genes was assessed by PCR-amplification.

Biofilm production in laboratory media showed a higher number of biofilm-producers in the skin-derived group (43.7 %) compared to the PC-derived isolates (25 %). However, all skin and PC isolates formed biofilms in PCs. The prevalence of -positive biofilm-producer isolates was similar in PC and skin isolates (16.6 and 18.8 %, respectively). In contrast, the abundance of -negative biofilm-producers was lower in PC isolates compared to skin isolates (8.3 vs 25 %, respectively).

Positive selection of biofilm-producers during blood donation and PC manufacturing was not observed. Interestingly, -negative biofilm-producers seem to be negatively affected by skin disinfection, blood processing and PC storage. Furthermore, this study shows that adopts a biofilm-forming phenotype in PCs regardless of its genetic background or origin.

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2018-02-01
2019-12-14
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