1887

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the toxigenic colonization (CDC, colonization with toxigenic but without symptoms) and infection (CDI, active infection resulting in disease symptoms) in hepatic cirrhosis patients, identify the risk factors of CDC, and determine the correlation between CDC and CDI.

The strains of toxigenic were isolated from patients with hepatic cirrhosis within 48 h after admission, followed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Patients were divided into toxigenic CDC group and noncolonized (NC) group according to the colonization. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyse the risk factors for the CDC. Besides, the CDI incidence was compared between the two groups.

Colonization of toxigenic was identified in 104 cases (19.8 %). Eighteen sequence types (STs) were identified, among which ST-3, ST-54, ST-35 and ST-37 were the predominant types. Child-Pugh class C(relative risk, RR, 3.025; 95 % CI: 1.410–6.488), decrease of prothrombin time activity (PTA) (RR 2.180; 95 % CI: 1.368–3.476), decrease of platelet (RR 2.746; 95 % CI: 0.931–8.103) and concurrent hepatic encephalopathy (RR 1.740; 95 % CI: 1.012–2.990) were identified as the risk factors for the hepatic cirrhosis patients with CDC. The CDI incidence in the CDC group was also significantly higher than that of the NC group (26.0 % vs 1.7 %, <0.001).

An carriage rate of 19.8 % was reported in the hepatic cirrhosis patients with colonization. Child's class C, decrease of PTA and platelet, and concurrent hepatic encephalopathy were the risk factors for the hepatic cirrhosis patients with colonization. Hepatic cirrhosis patients with colonization were more susceptible to CDI.

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2017-10-01
2020-01-20
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