1887

Abstract

and provoke serious infections, especially in intensive care unit (ICU) patients.

The risk factors and predictors of mortality for (=84; 46 carbapenem-resistant) and (=129; all carbapenem-resistant) bloodstream infections (BSIs) in an ICU were evaluated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the agar disk diffusion method according to EUCAST guidelines. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by a gradient method (Etest). Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for during the carbapenem-resistant outbreak in 2014. Epidemiological data were collected from the patients’ chart reviews.

Hospitalization during the summer months, prior KPC-producing (KPC-Kp) BSI, and the administration of tigecycline, aminoglycosides and cortisone were independently associated with BSIs. MLST revealed the dissemination of clone ST227, including carbapenem-resistant strains. Hospitalization during the summer months, prior KPC-Kp BSI, and the administration of antibiotics, carbapenem and cortisone were independently associated with BSIs. The 30-day mortality rate for and BSI was 45.2 and 39.5 %, respectively. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score at onset, septic shock, age, and prior KPC-Kp BSI were significantly associated with BSI mortality. The administration of at least one active antibiotic was identified as a predictor of a good prognosis. Septic shock and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II at onset were independently associated with BSI mortality. The administration of at least one active antibiotic and colistin–vancomycin co-administration were identified as predictors of a good prognosis.

KPC-Kp infection predisposes ICU patients to BSI by either or . The administration of at least one active antibiotic leads to better survival rates.

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2017-08-01
2019-12-13
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