1887

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency and age distribution of different Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) genotypes causing ophthalmia neonatorum (ON) in Hungary. Using CT specific PCR, we tested 76 conjunctival samples from symptomatic infants up to 3 months old in the National Centre for Epidemiology, Budapest between 2008 and 2016. CT tested positive in 30 of 76 conjunctival samples (39.5 %). The sequencing of the positive samples was successful in every case but one, and resulted in 48 % dominance for genotype E (14/29), followed by 24 % for genotype G (7/29), 10 % for J (3/29), 6.9 % for K and F (2/29), and 3.4 % for H (1/29). CT must still be regarded as a common pathogen causing ON in Hungary. Routine screening and treatment of pregnant women can be recommended to prevent these conditions. Chronic ON cases can be reduced by early diagnosis. Further research is needed to explain the dominance of genotypes E and G.

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2017-07-10
2019-12-08
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