1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Two hundred and seven strains of bacteria from human faeces were screened for their ability to convert oleic acid to hydroxystearic acid . Ninety-four strains were able to perform this reaction. All but one of the enterococci tested were active, and some active strains were also found among strains (18%), bifidobacteria (32%), clostridia (50%), and enterobacteria (21%). Oleic acid-hydrating bacteria were also able to hydrate palmitoleic but not linoleic acid. Relationship could not be demonstrated between faecal hydroxystearic acid level and the number of bacteria in the faeces able to produce this acid.

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1974-05-01
2022-01-23
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