1887

Abstract

From 1974 to 1994, 2033 microbiological specimens from children were submitted for cultures for anaerobic bacteria. Fifty-seven isolates of spp. were obtained from 55 (3%) children, 67 isolates of spp. from 65 (3%) children and 41 isolates of spp. from 40 (2%) children. Most isolates were from chronic otitis media, abscesses, peritonitis, aspiration pneumonia and paronychia. Most isolates were from abscesses, peritonitis, decubitus ulcers and bites. spp. were mainly isolated from abscesses, aspiration pneumonia, bacteraemia and conjunctivitis. Most (> 90%) infections from which these species were isolated were polymicrobial and yielded a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The organisms most commonly isolated with the non-sporing anaerobic gram-positive rods were spp., spp., pigmented and spp., spp., and . Most spp. and were isolated from intra-abdominal infection and skin and soft tissue infection around the rectal area, whereas most and isolates were from oropharyngeal, pulmonary and head and neck sites. The predisposing conditions associated with the isolation of non-sporing anaerobic gram-positive rods were previous surgery, malignancy, steroid therapy and immunodeficiency. Antimicrobial therapy was given to 149 (83%) of the 160 patients, in conjunction with surgical drainage or correction of pathology in 89 (56%).

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-45-1-21
1996-07-01
2022-09-30
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/45/1/medmicro-45-1-21.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-45-1-21&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Brook I. Pediatric anaerobic infection: diagnosis and management. 2nd edn St Louis: Mosby; 1989
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Georg L. K., Roberstad G. W., Brinkman S. A., Hicklin M. D. A new pathogenic anaerobic Actinomyces species. J Infect Dis 1965; 115:88–99
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Hill G. B., Ayers O. M., Kohan A. P. Characteristics and sites and infection of Eubacterium nodatum, Eubacterium timidum, Eubacterium brachy, and other asaccharolytic eubacteria. J Clin Microbiol 1987; 25:1540–1545
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bayer A. S., Chow A. W., Betts D., Guze L. B. Lactobacillemia – report of nine cases: important clinical and therapeutic considerations. Am J Med 1978; 64:808–813
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bourne K. A., Beebe J. L., Lue Y. A., Ellner P. D. Bacteremia due to Bifidobacterium, Eubacterium or Lactobacillus; twenty-one cases and review of the literature. Yale J Biol Med 1978; 51:505–512
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Finegold S. M. Anaerobic bacteria in human disease. New York: Academic Press; 1977
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Brook I., Frazier E. H. Significant recovery of nonsporulating anaerobic rods from clinical specimens. Clin Infect Dis 1993; 16:476–480
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Holdeman L. V., Cato E. P., Moore W. E. C. (eds) Anaerobe laboratory manual. 4th edn Blacksburg V. A.: Anaerobe Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; 1977
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Summanen P., Baron E. J., Citron D. M., Strong C. A., Wexler H. M., Finegold S. M. Wadsworth anaerobic bacteriology manual. 5th edn Belmont C. A.: Star Publishing Company; 1993
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Murray P. R., Baron E. J., Pfalter M. A., Tenover F. C., Yolken R. H. Manual of clinical microbiology. 6th edn Washington DC: ASM Press; 1995
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Sato J., Mochizuki K., Homma N. Affinity of the Bifidobacterium to intestinal mucosal epithelial cells. Bifidobacteria Microflora 1982; 1:51–54
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Gorbach S. L., Thadepalli H. Clindamycin in pure and mixed anaerobic infections. Arch Intern Med 1974; 134:87–92
    [Google Scholar]
  13. O’Connor J., MacCormick D. E. Mixed organism peritonitis complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. NZ Med J 1982; 95:811–812
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Thomas A. V., Sodeman T. H., Bentz R. R. Bifidobacterium (Actinomyces) eriksonii infection. Am Rev Respir Dis 1974; 110:663–668
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Hata D., Yoshida A., Ohkubo H. Meningitis caused by Bifidobacterium in an infant. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1988; 7:669–671
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Vincent J. W., Falkler W. A., Suzuki J. B. Systemic antibody response of clinically characterized patients with antigens of Eubacterium brachy initially and following periodontal therapy. J Periodontol 1986; 57:625–631
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Fainstein V., Elting L. S., Bodey G. P. Bacteremia caused by non-sporulating anaerobes in cancer patients. A 12-year experience. Medicine (Baltimore) 1989; 68:151–162
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Brook I. Anaerobic bacterial bacteremia: 12-year experience in two military hospitals. J Infect Dis 1989; 160:1071–1075
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Cox S. M., Phillips L. E., Mercer L. J., Stager C. E., Waller S., Faro S. Lactobacillemia of amniotic fluid origin. Obstet Gynecol 1986; 68:134–135
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Sherman M. E., Albrecht M., DeGirolami P. C. Lactobacillus: an unusual case of splenic abscess and sepsis in an immunocompromised host. Am J Clin Pathol 1987; 88:659–662
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Sutter V. L., Finegold S. M. Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to 23 antimicrobial agents. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1976; 10:736–752
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Rolfe R. D., Finegold S. M. Comparative in vitro activity of ceftriaxone against anaerobic bacteria. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1982; 22:338–341
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Wexler H. M., Finegold S. M. In vitro activity of cefotetan compared with that of other antimicrobial agents against anaerobic bacteria. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1988; 32:601–604
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-45-1-21
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-45-1-21
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error