1887

Abstract

The potential of exocellular carbohydrate antigens of as markers of infection in bone was investigated by immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Exocellular antigens were prepared by gel filtration chromatography of concentrated brain heart infusion culture supernates. The antigenic material appeared as diffuse bands between 24 and 32 kDa on the immunoblots and was not susceptible to digestion with trypsin, indicating that the response in the patients was to non-protein (polysaccharide or teichoic acid, or both) exocellular material. Significant differences were detected between the immunoblot antigen profiles for serum IgG from patients with bone infection and those with an uninfected prosthetic joint. Thirteen of 16 patients with prosthetic joint infection showed an elevated serum IgG level by ELISA compared with controls with uninfected joints. However, the antigen was not specific for bone infection; high levels of IgG were also detected in patients with other serious staphylococcal and streptococcal infections. The ELISA test may be valuable in distinguishing between staphylococcal infection of joints and aseptic loosening by excluding cases of infection.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-5-355
1996-05-01
2022-01-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jmm/44/5/medmicro-44-5-355.html?itemId=/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-5-355&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Jansen B., Schumacher-Perdreau F., Peters G., Pulverer G. New aspects in the pathogenesis and prevention of polymer-associated foreign body infections caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci. J Invest Surg 1989; 2:361–380
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Ling R. S. M. Complications of total hip replacement. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone; 1984
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Krikler S. J., Lambert P. A. Extracellular proteins as a potential marker of active Staphylococcus aureus infection in bone. J Med Microbiol 1992; 37:227–231
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Lambert P. A., Krikler S. J., Patel R., Parvathan S. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of antibodies to exocellular proteins of Staphylococcus aureus in bone infection. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1992; 100:67–70
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Krikler S. J., Pennington T. H., Petrie D. Typing of strains of Staphylococcus aureus by Western Blot analysis of culture supernates. J Med Microbiol 1986; 21:169–171
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Bell J. A., Pennington T. H., Petrie D. T. Western blot analysis of staphylococcal antibodies present in human sera during health and disease. J Med Microbiol 1987; 23:95–99
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Archer G. L. Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci. In Mandell G. L., Bennett J. E. (eds.) Principles of infectious diseases 3rd edn New York: Churchill Livingstone; 19901511–1518
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Peters G., Locci R., Pulverer G. Adherence and growth of coagulase-negative staphylococci on surfaces of intravenous catheters. J Infect Dis 1982; 146:479–482
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Peters G., Schumacher-Perdreau B., Jansen B., Bey M., Pulverer G. Biology of S. epidermidis extracellular slime. Zentralbl Bakteriol Mikrobiol Hyg Abt 1 1987 Suppl 1615–32
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Tojo M., Yamashita N., Goldmann D. A., Pier G. B. Isolation and characterization of a capsular polysaccharide adhesin from Staphylococcus epidermidis . J Infect Dis 1988; 157:713–722
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Christensen G. D., Barker L. P., Mawhinney T. P., Baddour L. M., Simpson W. A. Identification of an antigenic marker of slime production for Staphylococcus epidermidis . Infect Immun 1990; 58:2906–2911
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Mack D., Nedelmann M., Krokotsch A., Schwarzkopf A., Heeseman J., Laufs R. Characterization of transposon mutants of biofilm-producing Staphylococus epidermidis impaired in the accumulative phase of biofilm production: genetic identification of a hexosamine-containing polysaccharide intercellular adhesin. Infect Immun 1994; 62:3244–3253
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hussain M., Hastings J. G. M., White P. J. Comparison of cell-wall teichoic acid with high-molecular-weight extracellular slime material from Staphylococcus epidermidis . J Med Microbiol 1992; 37:368–375
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lambe D. W., Ferguson K. P., Keplinger J. L., Gemmell C. G., Kalbfleisch J. H. Pathogenicity of Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus schleiferi, and three other coagulase-negative staphylococci in a mouse model and possible virulence factors. Can J Microbiol 1990; 36:455–463
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Jansen B., Schumacher-Perdreau F., Peters G., Pulverer G. Evidence for degradation of synthetic polyurethanes by Staphylococcus epidermidis . Int J Med Microbiol 1991; 276:36–45
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Lugtenberg B., Meijers J., Peters R., van Der Hoek P., van Alphen L. Electrophoretic resolution of the ‘major outer membrane protein’ of Escherichia coli K12 into four bands. FEBS Lett 1975; 58:254–258
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sharp J., Poxton I. R. Analysis of the membrane lipocarbohydrate antigen of Clostridium difficile by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1986; 34:97–100
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Havaei S. A., Hancock I. C. The capsular turnover product of Staphylococcus aureus strain Smith. FEMS Microbiol Lett 1994; 118:37–43
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Beachey E. H., Courtney H. S. Bacterial adherence: the attachment of group A streptococci to mucosal surfaces. Rev Infect Dis 1987; 9: Suppl 5475–481
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-5-355
Loading
/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/00222615-44-5-355
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error